Cover

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Half Title Page, Series page, Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-viii

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Editors’ Introduction

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pp. ix-xii

The Baylor–Mohr Siebeck Studies in Early Christianity series aims to facilitate increased dialogue between German and Anglophone scholarship by making recent German research available in English translation. In this way, we hope to play a role in the advancement of our common field of study. The target audience for the series is primarily scholars and graduate students, though some volumes may also be accessible to advanced...

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Introduction to the English Edition

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pp. xiii-xvi

In the introduction to the German edition (below), I provide information about the motives that moved me to write a book on the institutional contexts of theology in the imperial period and about the biographical and institutional contexts of the emergence of this book. For this reason, I can actually register only two points here. In my first attempt to build upon the program for a new history of theology developed here—namely, in...

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Introduction to the German Edition

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pp. xvii-xxvi

When I first had to give public academic lectures as a church historian at the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, I considered for quite some time before the announcement whether I should offer the two cycles of my subject— namely, “church history” and “history of dogma or theology”—separately according to the traditional praxis of German Protestant faculties or whether I should combine them instead. There are good reasons for both approaches. The...

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1 Theology and Institution: Terminological Clarifications

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pp. 28-57

Every contemporary account of the history of the ideas and institutions of ancient Christianity is deeply influenced by the fact that it takes place against the background of a history of the religion that reaches into the present. Over the course of the nearly two-thousand-year history of theoretical reflection on Christianity, the meanings of many terms we use have often changed drastically. Indeed, we might fear that modern terminology’s...

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2 Three Institutional Contexts

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pp. 58-217

In this first main part of our investigation, we will deal with three characteristic examples of institutional contexts of explicit and implicit Christian theology in the second and third centuries—namely, first the free teachers and Christian schools (section 2.1), then “Montanism” as a paradigm for an explicit theology that is not oriented toward the contemporary...

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3 Institution and Norm

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pp. 218-327

In the first part of our investigation, we have seen with reference to three examples that ancient Christianity developed very different forms of implicit and explicit theology within diverse institutional frameworks and the process by which it did so (sections 2.1–2.3). At this point, it would now be possible to expand our paradigmatic approach, to continue with a comprehensive history of ancient Christian theology in the form of a classic...

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4 The Identity and Plurality of Ancient Christianity

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pp. 328-373

In this book we have studied—partly only very paradigmatically—the very different institutional contexts in which people practiced what we today, following a late ancient and medieval use of language, call “theology.” With good reason, one must doubt whether an observer from the early imperial period would even have perceived as a unity everything that was carried out by free teachers in the great cities, permanently employed...

Appendix: Visual Presentation of the Findings on the Lists

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pp. 374-389

Bibliography

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pp. 390-487

Index of Ancient Sources

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pp. 488-504

Index of Ancient Names and Places

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pp. 505-510

Index of Authors

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pp. 511-521