Cover

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Title page

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Contents

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pp. xi-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

I wish to thank a number of people who helped with this project in various ways. Thanks to Bill Regier at the University of Illinois Press for responding enthusiastically to my initial query, guiding me through the proposal process, and answering questions as I prepared the manuscript, and to Julie Gay for her excellent copyediting...

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Introduction: All the Lives He Led

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pp. 1-12

The title of Frederik Pohl’s final novel, All the Lives He Led, published in 2011 when he was ninety-one years old, appropriately describes the life and career of its author. No other writer in the field of science fiction can match Frederik Pohl’s life in science fiction...

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Chapter 1 The Way the Future Was, 1930–1951

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pp. 13-46

Like many of his young contemporaries in the early 1930s (and those generations to follow), when Frederik Pohl discovered science fiction at age ten in 1930, it was a revelation. At that time, science fiction as a defined category of fiction was only in its fifth year, although science fiction itself had a much longer pedigree. Hugo Gernsback launched the first science fiction magazine, Amazing Stories, in April 1926...

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Chapter 2 The Galaxy Years, 1952–1969

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pp. 47-104

The early 1950s were marred by the Cold War paranoia of McCarthyism, when intellectuals around the country were investigated, indicted, and otherwise harassed. Curiously, the science fiction community, by and large, was not brought before the McCarthyite witch hunters, even though they had been writing stories about atomic war, political oppression, and future power-politics and...

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Chapter 3 Gateways, 1970–1987

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pp. 105-156

After Pohl stepped down from Galaxy, he went into a funk, and though he now had time to write, he wasn’t writing. Having turned fifty at the close of 1969, Pohl attests that he was experiencing a midlife crisis.1 Though he was absorbing all that he had learned as editor of Galaxy and reflecting on the changes that were happening in American society and in science fiction...

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Chapter 4 The Boy Who Would Live Forever, 1988–2013

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pp. 157-196

Chernobyl and The Annals of the Heechee mark a transition in Pohl’s career. The books that follow focus less on the Cold War and more on new, pressing issues facing the contemporary world. For instance, The Voices of Heaven (1994) takes on religious zealotry, a rising phenomenon that was becoming increasingly problematic in the 1990s. Homegoing (1989) considers the environmental crisis...

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Conclusion

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pp. 197-198

Frederik Pohl’s death on September 2, 2013, leaves a chasm in the world of science fiction. His contributions to the field, as writer, editor, agent, and fan, are unmatchable. He truly was a giant in the field. Writing shortly after Pohl’s death, Joe Haldeman summed the man up succinctly: “For all the lives Fred did lead, he did an amazing job. We’ll never see his match.”1 James Gunn, among the last surviving major figures of Pohl’s generation...

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A Conversation with Frederik Pohl and Elizabeth Anne Hull

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pp. 199-212

This interview was conducted at the home of Frederik Pohl and Elizabeth Anne Hull in Palatine, Illinois, on July 17, 2013, slightly more than six weeks before Pohl’s death on September 2. By this time, as he was nearing the end, Pohl was only able to sustain conversation for about an hour, but he was still able to respond to further questions after some brief rests...

A Frederik Pohl Bibliography

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pp. 213-218

Notes

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pp. 219-226

Bibliography of Secondary Sources

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pp. 227-232

Index

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pp. 233-250