Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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Preface

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pp. vii-xviii

Immediately prior to the publication of Netochka Nezvanova in 1849, an insecure Dostoevsky wrote to Alexander Kraevsky, editor of The Fatherland Notes, a progressive liberal journal: “I know perfectly well that . . . Netochka Nezvanova is a good literary work, so good that The Fatherland Notes can...

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1. The Basics: Codependency, Dostoevsky, and Netochka Nezvanova

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pp. 1-35

Social scientists and researchers understand codependency variously.¹ In the most general terms, they regard the phenomenon as embracing anything that prevents both children and adults from sustaining healthy relationships with themselves or others. More specifically, investigators see codependency...

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2. All in the Codependent Family (I): Netochka and Efimov

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pp. 36-77

From the first sentence of her story, Netochka notes that her family situation has been less than ideal. Her biological father died when she was two years old, and her mother’s second marriage to an individual named Efimov began with love “[but ended in] great suffering” (142). She hints at...

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3. All in the Codependent Family (II): Netochka and Katya

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pp. 78-109

The now nine-year-old Netochka is saved from Efimov’s fate by a fortuitous event. When she awakens, she finds that fate has smiled upon her. Indeed, as the girl looks about her new surroundings, she wonders whether, even without her stepfather, she has realized her fantasy dreams of a...

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4. All in the Codependent Family (III): Netochka and Alexandra Mikhailovna

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pp. 110-154

Netochka’s move into the third and last stage of her narrative features many of the same codependence-inspired lacunae and inconsistencies as the earlier parts of her tale. She does not explain why Katya and her mother postpone their return from Moscow indefinitely. She does not inform her...

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Conclusion

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pp. 155-160

On March 31, 1849, Dostoevsky wrote to Kraevsky, editor of The Fatherland Notes, that he would deliver the third part of Netochka Nezvanova in the first week of April, and that he planned to present the fourth and fifth parts of the work to him by mid-month. “Notwithstanding the fact that I...

Notes

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pp. 161-188

Bibliography

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pp. 189-196

Index

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pp. 197-204