Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Epigraphs

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Series Editors’ Introduction

Regna Darnell and Stephen O. Murray

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pp. xi-xiv

Fascination with American Indian antiquities was intimately related to the emerging identity of a distinct American nation, whose citizens were to be harbingers of a New World in which institutions of freedom and democracy were poised to...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xx

Exactly when and where a book project is born is sometimes difficult to pinpoint. Perhaps in my own case it began as a schoolboy with chance encounters with the prehistoric Indian mounds of the Miami Valley of southwestern Ohio— an enduring interest...

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Prologue: Historicizing the Origins of American Archaeology

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pp. 1-38

The incipient phases of American archaeology developed within an eclectic set of interests and equally varied settings. The intellectual frameworks, institutional venues, and personalities that shaped its development from the late eighteenth century through the close of the nineteenth are distinctly discernible but not necessarily...

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1. American Antiquities: A Grand Theme for Speculation

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pp. 39-93

Encounters with archaeological remains in North America reflect the different historical circumstances and geopolitical contexts in which the Spanish, French, English, and Americans explored and colonized different regions of the continent from the sixteenth through the late...

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2. Rediscovering the Mounds: Scientific Enquiry and the Westward Movement

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pp. 94-151

The expansion of the American republic into the trans- Appalachian West during the 1780s had an unintended consequence— the Euro- American rediscovery of the mounds and the beginning of scholarly discourse about their origins, antiquity, and purposes...

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3. Antiquaries, Ideas, and Institutions: More Testimony from the Mounds

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pp. 152-204

The ancient works located along the Ohio River and its tributaries continued to receive the attention of curious travelers and residents of the western states during the early nineteenth century. Several of those accounts were more substantive and reliable than...

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4. A Dialectical Discourse: Constructing the Mound Builder Paradigm

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pp. 205-252

The Mound Builder paradigm was an incremental construction rather than an epiphany. Significant points of convergence and divergence accented the discourse regarding the origin and era of the mounds. The Mound Builder paradigm cannot legitimately...

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5. American Archaeology: An Infant Science Emerges

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pp. 253-310

The 1840s were exciting and expansive years in the development American archaeology and ethnology. The explosion of interest in those subjects during that decade arose from a set of concurrent circumstances, the establishment...

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6. Origin, Era, and Region: An Expanding Field of Archaeological Enquiry

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pp. 311-360

The development of the ideas, methods, and theories that defined American archaeology as an emerging science in the 1840s correspondingly indicated future lines of research. The fieldwork undertaken in the 1850s primarily focused on further delineating...

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7. Archaeology as Anthropology: The Coming of the Curators and Professors

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pp. 361-422

The last quarter of the nineteenth century witnessed the emergence of a self- conscious and specialized anthropological profession— not fully developed but definitely striving toward self- definition and structure. Developments within the discipline of archaeology...

Notes

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pp. 423-476

Bibliography

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pp. 477-560

Index

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pp. 561-574