Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

This book would not be what it is without the support of numerous colleagues and friends. Peter Lake, Peter Silver, and John Murrin read interminable early draft s of the project and offered a wealth of criticism and insight. Sara Brooks, Rupali Mishra, and a long list of other Princeton friends and acquaintances provided moral support. The book in its current...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-10

A characteristic early Stuart colonial project—which, uncharacteristically, survived—seventeenth-century Maryland is both familiar and foreign. Seen, as it often has been, through the lens of its land, workers, and staple commodity, Maryland’s seventeenth century appears as an uneasy coalescence...

Part I. Confessional Politics

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1. The Early Chesapeake and the Politics of Jacobean England

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pp. 13-25

The “merging and emerging worlds” of the early Chesapeake seemed to promise vast profits and marvelous vistas of adventure and abundance.1 What form that profit might take remained as uncertain as English knowledge of Chesapeake people and geography. Elizabethan experience offered an array...

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2. The Personal Rule of Lord Baltimore

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pp. 26-46

Charles I dismissed Parliament in early 1629 and did not summon it again until 1640, when the demands of war with Scotland made it unavoidable. He had come to believe that a faction of anti-monarchical conspirators, most of them Puritans, were working to undermine his authority and alienate...

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3. Anarchy and Allegiance

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pp. 47-57

The 1630s offered Cecil Calvert an opportunity unavailable to his Catholic predecessors, for his colonial venture in the Chesapeake offered both a prospect of New World profit and a chance to rearrange old relationships between English Catholics and the state. But although the 1630s suggested a new...

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4. Pamphlets, Polemic, and the Revolutionary State

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pp. 58-78

The 1650s were a turning point in the history of English overseas expansion. Much of the foundation of the eighteenth-century empire was laid in the revolutionary decades between 1640 and 1660. The English state began to assert its power more directly in its colonial possessions, sometimes by...

Part II. Colony and Empire

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5. Conflicts of Interest

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pp. 81-91

Old met new in the English empire during the 1660s, 1670s, and 1680s. The political culture and confessional fractures of the early Stuart period persisted—the events of mid-century had laid bare but not solved the conflicts that had led to revolution. Charles II was restored to the throne...

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6. War and Peace in the Chesapeake

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pp. 92-103

The controversy over the tobacco trade in the 1660s extended across the Atlantic and southward from Maryland into Virginia and Carolina. The web of Chesapeake politics also reached north and west into the interior of the continent and back many centuries before the arrival of the...

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7. The Proprietary Regime and the Machinery of Empire

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pp. 104-126

Thomas Notley described the threat to order in the 1670s as bubbling up from below in the form of the common people’s terrifying “frenzy” at the threat of war with Indians and the prospect of higher taxes to pay for it. The pressures placed on the proprietary regime in Maryland in the decades after 1660...

Part III. Crisis

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8. Rumor and Politics

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pp. 129-141

Over the course of the seventeenth century, American colonists revised the script of English anti-popery. As early as the 1650s, anti-proprietary writers added a New World dimension when they connected Lord Baltimore’s “nursery for Jesuits” with economic manipulation that caused...

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9. News, Rumor, and Rebellion

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pp. 142-158

Nicholas Spencer of Virginia complained in March of 1689 of common planters’ “ruinous imaginations.”1 But the rumor panic of 1689 was not the first time that tall tales threatened the security of the proprietary regime. Maryland nearly had a Bacon’s Rebellion of its own in the early...

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10. Glorious Revolutions

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pp. 159-174

The Revolution of 1688 was a turning point in the long restructuring of the English—soon to be British—empire between 1675 and the first decades of the eighteenth century. In Maryland, as in New York and Massachusetts, it offered local elites the opportunity to overturn regimes many of them...

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Epilogue

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pp. 175-180

Much like the revolution in Britain, the consequences of regime change in Maryland took time to work out. Most people’s day to day experience with local authority did not change profoundly.1 Beyond the borders of what was now a royal colony, circumstances peculiar...

Notes

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pp. 181-222

Bibliography

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pp. 223-246

Index

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pp. 247-260