Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction: Censorship and Adultery

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pp. 1-15

Adultery may seem an unlikely, and perhaps unwise, place from which to begin a study of censorship and culture. Adultery, after all, is the most bourgeois of transgressions. On a continuum of shock-effect it would not occupy a position close to either the high or low extremes that Peter Stallybrass and Allon White argue are so fruitful in interrogations of transgression....

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1. The Democracy of Print: The Mid-Victorian Censorship Debates

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pp. 16-61

In Wilkie Collins's 1888 The Legacy of Cain a father tells his daughter a story about her distant cousins. When the daughter asks about her cousin's marriage, however, the father abruptly stops his narrative. "The marriage was dissolved by law," he tells her, "and the wife was the person to blame. I am...

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2. Columns of Scandal: The Divorce Court Journalism Debates

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pp. 62-111

No attempt to document the visibility of adultery in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century England would be complete without a consideration of the divorce bill passed as part of the Matrimonial Causes Act in 1857. And yet a detailed analysis of the connections between this divorce bill, the divorce court journalism to which it was related, and literary production is...

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3. An Undercurrent of the Body: The Sensation Novel Debates

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pp. 112-153

In 1868 Francis Paget wrote a long and erratic sensation novel, Lucretia; or The Heroine of the Nineteenth Century', to which he appended a polemical indictment of the sensation novel genre itself. The novel charts the adventures of a heroine who reads too much and, under the influence of her reading, engages in a number of thoughtless, but not ultimately harmful, actions....

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4. A National Habit of Repression: Henry James's Negotiation of Adultery in The Golden Bowl

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pp. 154-201

It is only one short step from Sir Francis Jeune's reference to England's national habit of repression to a consideration of England's national habit of censorship. As the print censorship, divorce court journalism, and sensation novel debates attest, this "habit" represents a chapter in England's history that has more often been written as a story of hypocrisy and psychological...

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5. A Good Read: Ford Madox Ford's A Call and The Good Soldier

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pp. 202-243

Toward the end of Ford Madox Ford's The Good Soldier Nancy Rufford finds a newspaper article recounting a divorce trial to prove adultery (or "guilty intimacy" as the case also puts it); she retires to her room anticipating a "good read" (237). But Nancy, we have been informed by John Dowell,...

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Conclusion: The Narrative of a Waking Body

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pp. 244-256

When I read this passage from Kristeva's Revolution in Poetic Language I was immediately sympathetic. Despite my reservations with Kristeva's argument as a whole I too wanted to embrace the recalcitrant historical turmoil so often absent from studies of language and studies of the novel. I too...

Notes

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pp. 257-272

Works Cited

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pp. 273-288

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 289-290

It is a pleasure to be able to thank those people who contributed to the development of this book. Several friends and colleagues offered insightful and much appreciated readings of the manuscript or discussions of issues related to the project at crucial stages. I am deeply grateful to Maggie Berg, Frances Berkman, Michael Bristol, Peter Brooks, Tony Cascardi, Daniel Cottom,...

Index

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pp. 291-300