Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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Preface

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pp. vii-viii

This book is the brainchild of Leslie Shaw, who unfortunately did not live to see its completion. It began with a symposium on prehispanic Maya markets at the 2007 Society for American Archaeology meeting in Austin, which Leslie and I co-organized. It developed into its current form largely...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-2

This book is the work of many hands, some visible in the final product, some not, all of whom deserve my deepest thanks.
The authors of the chapters not only produced wonderful contributions but were also generous with their time, data, and insights. They were gracious, too, in...

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Introduction. Research on Maya Markets

Eleanor M. King and Leslie C. Shaw

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pp. 3-32

In recent years, archaeological research on the economies of complex societies has increasingly focused on markets. Nowhere is this more evident than in Mesoamerica, which has featured prominently in recent books on market exchange (e.g., Garraty and Stark 2010; Hirth and Pillsbury...

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1. The Ethnohistoric Evidence for Maya Markets and Its Archaeological Implications

Eleanor M. King

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pp. 33-66

Contemporary archaeological ideas of Maya markets are based as much on ethnohistoric models of how trade operated as on archaeological indicators. Scholars have long mined this data to extract nuggets of information about market systems from the linguistic and historical records left by...

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2. The Marketplace at Tikal

Christopher Jones

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pp. 67-89

In 1964 the East Plaza at the site of Tikal in Guatemala (Fig. 2.1) underwent excavation by the author as part of the Tikal Project of the University of Pennsylvania. It was found to contain a distinctive and unusual type of building that suggested the presence of a marketplace (C. Jones 1969)...

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3. Ancient Maya Markets: Architectural Grammar and Market Identifications

Marshall Joseph Becker

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pp. 90-110

A “market” provides a solution to a basic economic problem involving the exchange of food and other products. How does a market work? Do vendors have set prices for goods or do they negotiate each sale with each specific customer? That was the case in America before Macy’s provided...

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4. How to Know It When We See It: Marketplace Identification at the Classic Maya Site of Buenavista del Cayo, Belize

Bernadette Cap

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pp. 111-137

There is growing evidence from comparisons of household consumption and production practices that the Classic Maya engaged in market exchange (e.g., Braswell and Glascock 2002; A. Chase and Chase 2004; Garcia 2008; Halperin et al. 2009; Masson and Freidel 2012; Sheets...

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5. Soil Chemistry in the Search for Ancient Maya Marketplaces

Richard E. Terry, Daniel A. Bair, and Eric G. Coronel

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pp. 138-167

Markets have long interested archaeologists, but they are becoming an even greater focus of research as scholars develop new models for pre-modern markets (King and Shaw, this vol.). Nowhere is this truer than the Maya area, where there has been a recent increase in the publication of...

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6. The Maya Marketplace at Maax Na, Belize

Leslie C. Shaw and Eleanor M. King

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pp. 168-194

The authors of the chapters in this book are all struggling with the same challenge—that of recognizing an ancient Maya marketplace as a complex set of archaeological and behavioral features. A market place should predictably exhibit certain patterns within its organization, including the...

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7. Markets and Marketing in the Classic Maya Lowlands: A Case Study from El Perú-Waka’

Keith Eppich and David Freidel

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pp. 195-225

How hard would it have been to buy an ear of corn at Tikal? Would it have been a fairly simple commercial transaction, say x number of cacao beans for y bushels of corn? Would a market at Tikal have resembled the one in Tlateloco famously witnessed by Bernal Díaz del Castillo in 1519? This...

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8. Markets Among the Ancient Maya: The Case of Caracol, Belize

Arlen F. Chase, Diane Z. Chase, Richard E. Terry, Jacob M. Horlacher, and Adrian S. Z. Chase

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pp. 226-250

There is general agreement today that the ancient Maya used markets within their communities. However, much like everything else in Maya society, there was variability in the form of these markets and in the goods that were available. In some communities, imported foodstuffs may have...

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9. Contemporary Maya Marketplaces: Gender, Social Change, and Implications for the Past

Susan J. Wurtzburg

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pp. 251-272

This contribution rounds out the archaeological and ethnohistoric data presented in other chapters with a foray into the contemporary sociological and anthropological literature. The goal is to review relevant recent ethnographic insights on Maya women’s roles in markets and marketing...

References Cited

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pp. 273-316

Contributors

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pp. 317-322

Index

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pp. 323-325