Cover

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Title Page, Other Works in the Series, Copyright, Epigraphs

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Contents

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Introduction. Five Postural Mutations of Laruelle and the Nonhuman

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pp. 1-50

We begin with a quotation and a joke, as is the fashion. It is doubtless that philosophers have been a perennial and easy target for ridicule—since Aristophanes’s The Clouds at least—some of it well deserved, some of it less so. Philosophy itself, however, is more than a halfhearted jest; as François Laruelle warns, “philosophy is too serious an affair to be left to the philosophers...

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1. Philosophy, the Path of Most Resistance

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pp. 51-96

In this chapter, we begin our film of Laruelle’s non-philosophy by taking the path of most resistance to his thought—philosophy itself—so as to expand on what he means by both philosophical circularity and authority. On one level, this will be the most orthodox of our five introductory obstructions. Indeed, using extant philosophies in order to make...

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2. Paraconsisten Fictions and Discontinuous Logic

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pp. 97-140

The preceding chapter concluded with the idea that the human, for Laruelle, “brings with him the primacy of the real over the possible.”1 In what is both a very Bergsonian yet also non-philosophical point, the Real cannot be conditioned by possibility, for the “possibles” (of philosophical imagination) are retroactively generated by the Real, by a...

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3. How to Act Like a Non-Philosopher

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pp. 141-180

In 1998 Gus Van Sant directed a shot-by-shot remake of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 classic horror film Psycho. Although the new film was in color, rather than the original’s black and white, and was set in a contemporary era with a new cast, it otherwise retained nearly all of the first film’s audiovisual structure—including Bernard Hermann’s...

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4. The Perfect Nonhuman: Philosomorphism and the Animal Rendering of Thought

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pp. 181-242

Within the history of psychology, behaviorism has a lot to answer for: in experimental study and clinical practice, its abuse of unfortunate animals, both human and nonhuman, is probably beyond redemption. Some of the simpler behaviors (“operants”) observed during its first iteration were doubtless prone to basic conditioning. But the long-term suffering...

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5. Performing the Imperfect Human

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pp. 243-282

It was Albert Camus who described actors as sincere liars (“l’acteur est un menteur sincère”). It is not that they do not do what they say or say what they do but that they do not even say what they say. Is Laruelle one of those (if only “by subtraction”)—some kind of poseur, ironist, or dissimulator? Or does he do quite the opposite—posing...

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Conclusion. Making a Monster of Laruelle: On Actualism and Anthropomorphism

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pp. 283-290

Throughout this work, we have said that Laruelle’s use of “man” or “human” called for its own non-philosophical treatment, for an extension of his method. And yet, as we already heard, in En tant qu’un, Laruelle writes that “man is a man for man,” as opposed to (some) philosophy’s proclamation that “man is a wolf, an eagle, or a sheep, etc. for...

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Coda. Paradise Now; or, The Brightest Thing in the World: On Nonhuman Utopia

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pp. 291-294

Laruelle writes, “One of the things that motivate non-philosophy is the eternal question ‘what is to be done?’”1 This study has looked at the dystopias of philosophy—its “worst places” or “positions”—in one response to Laruelle’s question. In this regard, Alexander Galloway notes that Laruelle does not follow received opinion when it comes to seeing utopia...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 295-296

The last five years of this book’s development bring with them a debt of gratitude to many people, but I would particularly like to thank Stella Baraklianou (for her photographic promenades), James Burton (for his metafictional advice), Laura Cull Ó Maoilearca (for teaching me everything I know about performance philosophy), and Hannah Still (for introducing...

Notes

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pp. 297-344

Bibliography

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pp. 345-362

Index, Other Works in the Series

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pp. 363-375

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About the Author

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John Ó Maoilearca is professor of film and television studies at Kingston University, London. He has also taught philosophy and film theory at the University of Sunderland, England, and the University of Dundee, Scotland. He has published ten books, including, as...