Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction: Reframing the Renaissance Garden

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pp. 1-16

In 1536, two female conjoined twins were dissected in the Orti Oricellari (Rucellai Gardens) in Florence. The humanist Benedetto Varchi, who was in attendance, gave a detailed account of the twins’ anatomy in his lectures on the generation of monsters (1548), before concluding that owing to “these & many other similar Monsters & different ones, like those that you see in the loggia of the Scala Hospital, we philosophically believe that there have been, & can...

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Chapter 1. The Legibility of Landscape: From Fascism to Foucault

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pp. 17-46

There have been some significant shifts in the study of historical landscape design during the past forty years. A comparison of two important conferences on the Italian Renaissance garden reveals a number of changes in emphasis and approach: the first Dumbarton Oaks Colloquium on the History of Landscape Architecture (1971) and the thirty- second colloquium (2007)....

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Chapter 2. The Grotesque and the Monstrous

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pp. 47-81

Il Sodoma’s decorative scheme for the cloister of the abbey at Monte Oliveto in Siena (1505–1508), includes a lesene frescoed with motifs derived from classical grotteschi and medieval marginalia. The sinuous tendrils and arabesques of the plant- like forms, familiar from the recently excavated Domus Aurea in Rome, support images of the “marvels of the east.”1 These were the monstrous races,...

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Chapter 3. A Monstruary: The Excessive, the Deficient, and the Hybrid

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pp. 82-114

If the imprecations of beggars and demons as well as the potentially malign influence of the maternal imagination are omitted from Ambroise Paré’s survey of monsters, three main categories are left.1 The first category is the excessive, which includes the doubled and the supernumerary. According to Paré, “too great a quantity of seed” will result in progeny with an excess of body parts....

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Chapter 4. “Rare and Enormous Bones of Huge Animals”: The Colossal Mode

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pp. 115-134

Alcofrybas’s account of life inside the giant Pantagruel’s gullet recalls Poliphilo’s exploration of the viscera of the lovesick colossus in Francesco Colonna’s Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, with an important difference.1 In Rabelais’s novel, the interior of the giant is a complete landscape in itself. After traveling for “two leagues” across Pantagruel’s tongue, for example, Alcofrybas wanders...

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Chapter 5. “Pietra Morta, in Pietra Viva”: The Sacro Bosco

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pp. 135-163

The Sacro Bosco in Bomarzo is an object lesson in the difficulties of interpretation that attend the study of historical gardens. It is not unlike the early seventeenth- century Hortus Palatinus in Heidelberg (c. 1613–1619), in that there are few documentary sources to guide the historian. The problem is compounded by the nearly complete absence of records of response to the Sacro Bosco until the twentieth century (besides the allusions to the garden in...

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Conclusion: Toward the Sublime

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pp. 164-172

In a letter to the Florentine traveler and merchant Benedetto Dei, Leonardo da Vinci wrote that a giant had appeared from the Libyan desert.1 This terrifying figure had

swollen and red eyes set beneath the awful, dark eyebrows which might cause the sky to be overcast and the earth to tremble. And, believe me, there is no man so brave but that when the fiery eyes...

Notes

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pp. 173-212

Bibliography

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pp. 213-232

Index

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pp. 233-244

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 245-246

This research was supported under the Australian Research Council’s Discovery Projects funding scheme (project number DP120103652). I am most grateful to the ARC, as well as to the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, the Garden and Landscape Studies Program at Dumbarton Oaks, and the Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture at Monash University...