Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-x

The research toward this publication has been supported and facilitated by several academic institutions and individuals. First, I am grateful to the University of Northern Colorado for a generous sabbatical leave and for a substantial Provost Fund grant for faculty scholarship and professional development during the academic year of 2010–11. My thanks go to the editors...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-11

Standard histories of medieval rhetoric and philosophy inform us that the rediscovery of Aristotle’s logical works in medieval Europe advanced the development of the scholastic method of learning and teaching, which lay at the heart of university curricula and spread scholastic habits of mind into the public sphere as well. These histories also tell us that Aristotelian logic, along with grammar...

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1. Al-Fārābī’s Book of Rhetoric

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pp. 12-49

Chronicler Jamāl al-Dīn al-Qifṭī informs us that Muḥammad ibn Muḥammad ibn Ṭarkhān Abū Naṣr al-Fārābī was of Turkish descent.1 He was born in Fārāb, in what is now Uzbekistan, in 870. His father was a Persian officer in the Turkish military, and his mother was Turkish. In the Aristotelian School of Baghdad, al-Fārābī studied the Arabic language and Islamic theology. He also studied...

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2. Avicenna’s Compendium, or Al-cArūdī’s Philosophical Treatise on the Meanings of the Book of Rhetoric

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pp. 50-71

The biographical information that we have available about Abū cAli ibn Sīnā, known in the West as Avicenna, comes from an autobiographical note that the Persian philosopher himself dictated to his disciple Abū cUbaid al-Juzjānī, who later took up his master’s story and recorded the episodes of the philosopher’s life up to the time of his death. We find this autobiographical note in al-Qifṭī’s ...

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3. Averroes’s Middle Commentary on the Book of Rhetoric (Book I)

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pp. 72-181

In cUyūn al-Anbā’ fī Ṭabqāt al-Aṭibbā’, Ibn Abī Uṣaybica informs us that Abū al-Walīd ibn Rushd, known in the West as Averroes,1 was born and raised in a family of magistrates and physicians that lived in Córdoba and Seville, Spain, during the reign of the Almoḥads. He was trained in jurisprudence (al-Fiqh), the science of the tradition of the Prophet Muḥammad (cilm al-Ḥadīth), theology...

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Conclusion

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pp. 182-186

The unifying thread throughout the three Arabic treatises on Aristotle’s Rhetoric that I have rendered in English has some important characteristics. We can recognize traces of Islamic discourse in the commentaries, for the commentators open their commentaries with the formulaic expression “In the name of Allah, the Merciful, the Compassionate” and close with words of praise...

Bibliography

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pp. 187-192

Index

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pp. 193-200

Author Biography

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pp. 201-201

Landmarks in Rhetoric and Public Address, also in this series

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pp. 202-202

Back Cover

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