Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-x

This volume is one of several to emerge from the Making Publics (MaPs) project (2005–10). We are grateful to the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC ) and its Major Collaborative Research Initiatives (MCRI) program for exemplary support of MaPs. The...

read more

Introduction

Marlene Eberhart, Amy Scott, and Paul Yachnin

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-16

In the summer of 2005, on what would be his last visit to Montreal, Richard Helgerson remarked to a group of colleagues that he had been writing about publics long before the creation of the Making Publics project. The project, “Making Publics: Media, Markets, and Association in...

Part I: Writing Publics (Publics and Nation)

read more

1. States, Nations, and Publics: The Politics of Language Reform in Renaissance England

David Harris Sacks

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 19-41

Among students of early modern English and British history and culture, Richard Helgerson is best known for his Forms of Nationhood: The Elizabethan Writing of England, published in 1992.¹ One of the book’s central claims—illustrated in a series of stimulating chapters arguing for the...

read more

2. Translating the Law: Sir Edward Coke and the Formation of a Juristic Public

Stephen Deng

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 42-57

In his influential book Forms of Nationhood, Richard Helgerson argues that a group of men from the same generation during the Elizabethan period—a group that includes Edmund Spenser, Sir Edward Coke, William Camden, John Speed, Michael Drayton, Richard Hakluyt, William...

read more

3. Apocalyptics and Apologetics: Richard Helgerson on Elizabethan England’s Religious Identity and the Formation of the Public Sphere

Torrance Kirby

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 58-74

“In early modern England the language of politics was most often the language of religion.” So Richard Helgerson claims in Forms of Nationhood. ¹ Brian Cummings makes the point even more forcefully: “without reference to religion,” he states, “the study of early modern writing is incomprehensible...

Part II: Forming Social Identities and Publics

read more

4. Perverse Delights: Cross Channel Trash Talk and Identity Publics

Anne Lake Prescott

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 77-92

We know that “it takes a village” to build up a child. But what does it take to build up a village? The village in which I am interested, and hardly the only one to which readers could belong, is the one created by the late sixteenth-century crowd of English readers attentive to the often horrifying...

read more

5. Making Public the Private

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 93-114

In 1982, Richard Helgerson prepared to enter the private sphere. A production of Arden of Faversham introduced him to a “level of everyday particularity” and an “extraordinary realism” he had not encountered before in Renaissance drama. Struck by Arden’s “richness of social detail,” he...

read more

6. Public and Private Intercourse in Dutch Genre Scenes: Soldiers and Enigmatic Women / Painters and Enigmatic Paintings

Angela Vanhaelen

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 115-132

There is an appealing myth of origins that occurs repeatedly in histories of Dutch genre painting: this art was born together with the Dutch Republic itself. As Théophile Thoré succinctly put it: “A société nouvelle, art nouveau”—“A new art for a new society.”¹ This claim was no doubt...

read more

7. Sonnets from Carthage, Ballads from Prison: Entertainment and Public Making in Early Modern Spain

Javier Castro-Ibaseta

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 133-152

Spanish poetry of the Golden Age underwent two momentous transformations in a short period of time. Each was quite different in nature but both were equally decisive in the evolution of modern Spanish and European literatures. The first shook the literary field between around 1530...

Part III: Networks and Publics

read more

8. Forms of Nationhood and Forms of Publics: Geography and Its Publics in Early Modern England

Lesley B. Cormack

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 155-175

Richard Helgerson’s book, Forms of Nationhood, included a groundbreaking examination of the ways in which geographical thought helped a nation imagine itself. Although not situated specifically within the theoretical framework of publics and public making, Helgerson was nevertheless...

read more

9. “The Land Speaks”: John Shrimpton’s Antiquities of Verulam and St. Albans and the Making of Verulamium

Meredith Donaldson Clark

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 176-193

In Forms of Nationhood, Richard Helgerson documents the “generative energy” that flowed through a generation of Elizabethans: those poets, playwrights, antiquarians, cartographers, lawyers, explorers, and theologians who, in their efforts to describe what they saw as the preexisting nation...

read more

10. Collectors, Consumers, and the Making of a Seventeenth-Century English Ballad Public: From Networks to Spheres

Patricia Fumerton

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 194-219

In 2005, when I joined Richard Helgerson as part of the UCSB branch of the Making Publics Project centered at McGill University and under the direction of Paul Yachnin, I had a sneaking suspicion that the combined scope and necessary granularity of this project could drive one mad. In...

read more

11. Forms of Internationality: The Album Amicorum and the Popularity of John Owen (1564–1622)

Vera Keller

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 220-234

The public studied by scholars since Habermas is a scientific object. That is, it does not exist in concrete reality as the mundane objects of everyday life do, nor does it even equal the sum total of human bodies gathered in any one place. Rather, the public is an abstracted category of...

Part IV: Theatrical Publicity

read more

12. The Voice of Caesar’s Wounds: The Politics of Martyrdom in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar

David Lee Miller

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 237-255

From Forms of Nationhood through A Sonnet from Carthage, Richard Helgerson’s major work describes literary figurations of public space through a dialectic of the local and the universal. In this dialectic, the immediacies of village and domicile are gathered into imaginary unities of nation and empire...

read more

13. Shakespeare’s Pains to Please

Jeffrey Knapp

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 256-271

Whenever Shakespeare plots to kill an English king, he always procrastinates, putting off the murder till late in the play; but in Macbeth (ca. 1606) the Scottish king Duncan is murdered early in the second act, having suffered repeated attacks, first from rebels, then from invaders, and finally...

read more

14. The Political Fortunes of Robin Hood on the Early Modern Stage

Jean E. Howard

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 272-288

In Forms of Nationhood, Richard Helgerson made some characteristically bold statements about Shakespeare’s English history plays of the 1590s in relation to those histories produced for companies connected to Richard Henslowe, particularly Worcester’s Men and the Admiral’s Men. Juxtaposing...

read more

Afterword: Richard Helgerson and Making Publics

Paul Yachnin

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 289-312

In this afterword, I reflect on Richard Helgerson’s scholarship, especially his masterwork, Forms of Nationhood, as seen through the multiplex lens of the splendid essays in this volume. I also consider the essays on their own terms, taking particular note of their critical treatment of Helgerson’s...

read more

About the Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 313-318

Javier Castro-Ibaseta is Lecturer III in the Romance Languages and Literatures department at the University of Michigan. His work focuses on the interconnections between political life and literature in early modern Spain, and particularly on the way in which the emergence of public forms of literature affected the...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 319-335

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF