Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

I am grateful to a number of individuals and institutions that supported this project, supplied materials, and provided insights. Colleagues at North Dakota State University helpfully discussed various aspects of the book during its writing, and graduate and undergraduate students in my travel...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-15

In her autobiography, Crusade for Justice, Ida B. Wells describes her response to a minister who had unjustly accused her of immoral behavior. She demanded that he read a retraction of his remarks from the pulpit and notes that she “wanted him to know at least one southern girl...

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1. Embodying Segregation: Ida B. Wells on the Antilynching Circuit

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pp. 16-32

Writing about the return voyage from her first trip to the United Kingdom in 1893, Ida B. Wells notes two “delightful” circumstances of the journey: “First, there were few if any white Americans on board. Second, there were fifteen young Englishmen in one party...

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2. Southernizing Travel in the Black Atlantic: Booker T. Washington’s The Man Farthest Down

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pp. 33-50

In The Man Farthest Down (1912), Booker T. Washington demonstrates the cultural and aesthetic negotiations germane to early twentieth- century black travel narratives and illuminates the critical tensions in these texts between mobility and identity that critics such as Farah J...

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3. “To Return and Tell the Tale of the Doing”: Matthew Henson and the African American Explorer’s Identity

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pp. 51-75

While also contending with the limiting forces of the slave narrative form, Matthew Henson is more successful than Washington in asserting the empowering nature of black identity and mobility in his travel writing. Near the end of A Negro Explorer at the North Pole (1912)...

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4. Cultural Work, Disorderly Mobility, and the Mundane Realities of Travel: Jessie Redmon Fauset and The Crisis

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pp. 76-108

Unlike Matthew Henson, Jessie Redmon Fauset makes less explicit claims to the African American traveler’s authority in her 1921 and 1925–26 travel essays in The Crisis magazine, where she was literary editor from 1919 until she left in 1926. Like Ida B. Wells and Zora Neale...

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5. Bodies of Knowledge: Cultural Authority and Black Female Mobility in Zora Neale Hurston’s Tell My Horse

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pp. 109-132

Discussing the role of the body in travel texts, Marguerite Helmers and Tilar J. Mazzeo note that travel writers have employed the “implied presence of the body” as a way to guarantee that their travel accounts are authentic and are based on “ ‘first-hand’ or ‘eyewitness...

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Epilogue

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pp. 133-136

The work of African American travel writers during the Jim Crow era is distinctive for its cultural dissonances, often represented as oscillations between the body and the gaze, conservatism and progressive critique, stasis and mobility, fact and stereotype, or eyewitness observation...

Notes

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pp. 137-162

Index

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pp. 163-170

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About the Author, Back Cover

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pp. 171-174

Gary Totten was born in Cranbrook, British Columbia, and grew up in the nearby town of Jaffray. He received a BA and MA from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, and a PhD from Ball State University. He is the editor of Memorial Boxes and...