Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

As Etta James sings, at last! This book has followed a long and sometimes torturous path to completion, and I am happy, finally, to be able to thank the friends, colleagues, students, administrators, audiences, archivists, and sundry others who shepherded it and me along the way. ...

read more

Introduction. Citizenship Stories in Exceptional Times

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-15

In 1955 the sociologist Samuel A. Stouffer published his landmark study Communism, Conformity, and Civil Liberties. Based on a massive survey of public opinion conducted in the summer of 1954, it sought to trace U.S. citizens’ reactions to “two dangers. One, from the Communist conspiracy outside and inside the country. ...

read more

One. Internal Security, National Security: Psychological Citizenship in the Cold War Era

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 16-47

The National Security Council report NSC 68, approved by President Truman in 1950, was the ultimate expression of U.S. containment policy. Articulating the foundations of the battle between the free and slave worlds and laying out the need for a fully realized strategy for winning that battle, it opened with a disquisition on democratic and totalitarian attitudes toward the individual. ...

read more

Two. The Case of the War Bride: Liberal Citizenship and Human Rights in the National Security State

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 48-79

On the morning of May 17, 1950, Ellen Raphael Boxhornova Knauff watched from the terminal as an American Airlines jet took off from Idlewild Airport for Frankfurt with sixty-six pounds of her luggage on board. Knauff, a thirty-five-year-old German war bride who had been held at Ellis Island for almost two years as she sought admission to the United States, had been scheduled for deportation on that plane. ...

read more

Three. The Right to Earn a Living: Loyalty, Race, and Economic Citizenship

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 80-118

"I may be sticking my neck out and I may be wrong. But I have been listening to you testify this afternoon, and I think you are telling the truth. . . . If you are not taken back into the Army . . . you come around and see me, and I am going to see that you get a job.” ...

read more

Four. “A Dependent Independence and a Dominated Dominion”: Empire and Semi-Citizenship on the Cold War Stage

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 119-156

Early on the morning of March 1, 1954, Delores “Lolita” Lebrón, Irving Flores Rodriguez, Andrés Figueroa Cordero, and Rafael Cancel Miranda, all members of Puerto Rico’s Nationalist Party (NP), left their homes in New York City to board a Washington–bound train. ...

read more

Five. “The Show of Violence”: Social Citizenship, Democracy, and the Remaking of National Security

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 157-191

In May 1955 the American Civil Liberties Union weighed in on the continuing debate over juvenile delinquency in American society. The group warned members of the U.S. Senate that while the problem of youth crime was indeed “alarming,” the growing demand for comic book censorship posed an even greater danger to the nation. ...

read more

Conclusion: Exceptions, Exceptionalism, and U.S. Citizenship

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 192-198

During the early Cold War years, the impact of the national security state on those vulnerable individuals whose membership in the U.S. polity was least secure sometimes awoke a broader public to the contradictions of American citizenship. ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 199-240

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 241-266

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 267-274

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF