Cover

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Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-viii

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Introduction

Harold Holzer

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pp. 1-6

Toward the end of his tragically curtailed life, Abraham Lincoln belatedly acknowledged a handsome gift that had arrived six months earlier from William Lloyd Garrison, the outspoken abolitionist editor who for years had ardently, sometimes disobligingly, pushed the seemingly reluctant...

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1. The Thirteenth Amendment

Michael Vorenberg

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pp. 7-21

The year 1865 was defined by the constitutional abolition of slavery. It began and ended with the Thirteenth Amendment. When the second session of the Thirty-Eighth Congress reconvened a few days after New Year’s Day, the most pressing matter the lawmakers faced was adoption...

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2. Grant and Lincoln: Partnership for Victory

John F. Marszalek and Michael B. Ballard

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pp. 22-39

As the year 1865 opened, two men stood poised to seal victory in the Civil War for the Union. Their stories had many of the same roots, but their personalities and styles differed. The fate of war brought them together, and together they joined forces to bring the bloodiest contest ever fought on...

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3. Lincoln and the Hampton Roads Conference

Richard Striner

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pp. 40-51

A colorful episode—in some respects inconsequential but in other ways important and suggestive—took place in early 1865 when Abraham Lincoln met with a delegation of Confederate commissioners.¹
This had not been Lincoln’s idea. Early in December 1864, in the aftermath...

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4. Abraham Lincoln’s Sermon on the Mount: The Second Inaugural

Ronald C. White, Jr.

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pp. 52-65

The movie Lincoln brought Abraham Lincoln once again front and center to audiences—not simply in the United States but around the world. Some moviegoers quibbled about the ending, believing the film should have concluded when Lincoln left the White House for the last time to attend...

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5. Lincoln’s Greatest Escapade: Walking through Richmond on April 4, 1865

Richard Wightman Fox

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pp. 66-80

The remembering of Abraham Lincoln has its own history. As time passes, some features of his career gain greater traction in Americans’ minds, while others fade from memory. Nothing is fixed once and for all. Aspects of his character or career that grow dimmer for a stretch of decades may...

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6. Why Was Lincoln Murdered?

Edward Steers, Jr.

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pp. 81-100

“I suppose Lincoln is a man of courage . . . he would undoubtedly resist being captured and I could not stand the imputation to having consented to Mr. Lincoln being assassinated.”¹ These words were not what the young officer sitting across from his president wanted to hear. But Jefferson Davis...

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7. Military Justice, Right or Wrong: Judging the Lincoln Conspirators

Frank J. Williams

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pp. 101-112

The spring of 1865 marked a trying time in America’s history. The nation had just endured a brutal, punishing four-year war. Just as the tide had begun to turn, in the midst of widespread national rejoicing at the restoration of peace, President Abraham Lincoln’s assassination provided...

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8. Allies or Adversaries? Lincoln, Douglass, and Black Suffrage

Edna Greene Medford

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pp. 113-125

Frederick Douglass never let custom or tradition restrict his thinking or limit his actions. Hence, when Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated for the second time in March 1865, the former fugitive from slavery invited himself to the inaugural reception. As Douglass recalled years later, his...

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9. From Living Hero to Martyred Icon: The Evolution of the Lincoln Image in 1865

Harold Holzer

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pp. 126-152

On January 24, 1865, a calamitous fire broke out in the picture gallery of Washington’s Smithsonian Institution, a building Abraham Lincoln had visited a number of times during his presidency. The blaze proved impossible to extinguish and soon engulfed much of the famous red “castle”...

Appendix A: Lincoln’s Final Months (January 1–April 15, 1865)

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pp. 153-172

Appendix B: Chronology for 1865

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pp. 173-177

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Appendix C: Lecture at the Inauguration of the Douglass Institute, by Frederick Douglass

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pp. 178-185

I have, during my public career, had the honor to address many assemblies, both at home and abroad, and in furtherance of various objects; but I do not remember ever to have appeared anywhere under a deeper sense of the importance of the occasion than I feel tonight. I know it is common...

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Appendix D: Letter to Francis Bicknell Carpenter from Mary Todd Lincoln, November 15, 1865

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pp. 186-188

Your last letter, has been received—It would be utterly impossible for me, in my present nervous state, to sit for a photograph—although, I should like to oblige you, very much. There is an excellent painted likeness of me, at Brady’s in N.Y. taken in 1861—have you, ever seen...

Contributors

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pp. 189-190

Index

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pp. 191-199

Back Cover

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