Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Foreword

John Ware

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pp. vii-ix

I’ll never forget sitting in a college classroom more than forty years ago listening to anthropologist Henry Dobyns describe the effects of Old World diseases on “virgin soil” New World populations. Dobyns guessed that there were between 90 and 120 million...

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Acknowledgments

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p. xi

We are extremely grateful for the opportunity to reconsider the causes of Native depopulation in the stimulating and hospitable atmosphere of the Amerind Foundation. Our lively discussions were interspersed with wonderful meals, scenic walks, and warm fires...

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Introduction

Paul Kelton, Alan C. Swedlund, Catherine M. Cameron

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pp. 3-15

European colonization introduced smallpox, measles, and other infectious diseases to the Americas, causing considerable harm and death to indigenous peoples. There is no question that these diseases were devastating, but their impact has been exaggerated...

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1. Death, Uncertainty, and Rhetoric

David S. Jones

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pp. 16-49

On Columbus Day, a Boston radio station replayed an interview with Charles Mann, author of the best-selling 1491 and 1493. He explained how an epidemic, introduced by shipwrecked French sailors by 1616, had left the Massachusetts coast “suddenly, radically depopulated...

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2. Population Decline and Culture Change in the American Midcontinent: Bridging the Prehistoric and Historic Divide

George R. Milner

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pp. 50-73

The early steps of what enabled Old World peoples to push aside the original inhabitants of North America, especially deep in the interior beyond the ken of European observers, are only imperfectly understood. Along the Atlantic and Gulf...

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3. Colonialism and Decline in the American Southeast: The Remarkable Record of La Florida

Clark Spencer Larsen

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pp. 74-98

A fundamental influence on shaping culture and biology in the modern world was the expansion of the European sphere to regions of the globe well beyond continental Europe. This expansion of European peoples, foods, diseases, and social values set into motion...

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4. Beyond Epidemics: A Bioarchaeological Perspective on Pueblo-Spanish Encounters in the American Southwest

Debra L. Martin

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pp. 99-118

Tourists flock to the American Southwest in part because it is home to many groups of Native Americans whose tribal names (such as Hopi and Zuni) are familiar and iconic in the collective national imagination. The Southwest is one of a small number of places...

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5. Identity Erasure and Demographic Impacts of the Spanish Caste System on the Indigenous Populations of Mexico

Gerardo Gutiérrez

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pp. 119-145

The Spanish caste system should be understood as an ideology/practice that created hierarchical categories of people to discriminate against individuals based on fictions of “purity of blood,” genealogy, religion, class, and occupation (Martínez 2009). Marital and extramarital...

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6. Contagion, Conflict, and Captivity in Interior New England: Native American and European Contacts in the Middle Connecticut River Valley of Massachusetts, 1616–2004

Alan C. Swedlund

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pp. 146-173

Most of us are familiar with the story of Governor Bradford and his fellow passengers settling in 1621 at Patuxet—to be named Plymouth by the English—and encountering their first Natives. Samoset, a northern Abenaki, enters their encampment, addresses...

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7. The Effects of Warfare and Captive-Taking on Indigenous Mortality in Postcontact North America

Catherine M. Cameron

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pp. 174-197

The size of the pre-Columbian indigenous population and the reasons for its decline were debated throughout the twentieth century by historians, anthropologists, physiologists, and other scholars, and most emphasized introduced disease as the major...

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8. Remembering Cherokee Mortality During the American Revolution

Paul Kelton

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pp. 198-221

On March 8, 1780, Cherokee warriors captured twenty-eight straggling travelers sailing down the Tennessee River and might have acquired something that they surely had not wished for: smallpox. The captives, all belonging to the Stuart family, were said...

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9. Quality of Life: Native Communities Within and Beyond the Bounds of Colonial Institutions in California

Kathleen L. Hull

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pp. 222-248

In 1986, a delegation of Yosemite Indians visiting the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History was confronted with a disturbing exhibit that proclaimed the extinction of their group more than one hundred years earlier (Rose 1990). Were it not for the profound...

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10. The Pestilent Serpent: Colonialism, Health, and Indigenous Demographics

James F. Brooks

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pp. 249-262

Deep in the summer of 1989, I found myself at On-a-Slant Village, a reconstructed Mandan earth lodge settlement in Fort Lincoln State Park near Mandan, North Dakota, at the junction of the Missouri and Heart Rivers. Founded around AD 1575 by Mandan...

Contributors

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pp. 263-268

Index

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pp. 269-275

Other Works in the Series

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