Cover

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Title Page, Other Works in the Series, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

Tables

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pp. xi-xii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xvi

I am enormously grateful to all the people who have helped on the Corey project. The lists below cannot express my sincere thanks and sense of wonder at the range and scope of friendships and collaborations that occurred and continue to inspire me.
The Corey site was excavated as joint field schools of Ithaca College and Wells College. The 2003 crew included Jason...

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Introduction: The Corey Site and Its Contexts

Jack Rossen

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pp. 1-14

Before coming to Ithaca College, I was primarily an Andeanist, performing archaeological research and teaching in Peru, Chile, and Argentina. I arrived in central New York as a temporary replacement for their South American archaeologist. While driving around the area, I became fascinated with the Cayuga landscape, including mounds, earthen...

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1. Site Setting, Description, and Excavations

Jack Rossen

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pp. 15-34

The Corey site lies above the protected gorge of Paines Creeks, an eastern tributary of Cayuga Lake. Paines Creek and its two unnamed tributaries lay transverse to the flow of glacial ice during the Pleistocene, and thus have stratified sediments as old as thirty thousand years (Muller and Caldwell 1986). The site is situated immediately above hard fossiliferous...

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2. Archaeogeophysical Surveys

Michael Rogers

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pp. 35-40

Magnetic gradiometer surveys were conducted from May 16 to May 27, 2005, using a Geometrics G858 cesium magnetometer system configured in 0.50-meter vertical gradient mode. A Sokkia SET6 total station was used to set out sixteen 20-by-20-meter contiguous archaeogeophysical survey units oriented on the northern tree line. Additional smaller units were...

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3. Ceramic Artifacts

David Pollack

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pp. 41-70

The analysis of the Corey site ceramic assemblage was guided by three primary goals. The first was to describe the salient characteristics of the ceramics recovered from the site, the second was to characterize the ceramic assemblage, and the third was to contextualize these materials relative to other Cayuga...

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4. Petrographic Analysis of Ceramics

Wesley D. Stoner

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pp. 71-81

Petrographic point counting is a very useful technique for characterizing ancient pottery. At a basic level, petrographic analysis is used to identify mineral and textural variation within a ceramic assemblage. This variation is introduced into a ceramic vessel through two major means: the use of different raw material sources and different paste recipes for...

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5. Lithic Raw Material Sources

Joseph F. Winiarz

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pp. 82-92

During the investigations of the Corey site, it was decided that a nondestructive and inexpensive method of comparing artifacts to raw lithic sources was needed. In order to fully assess the natural variations in the region’s geology, and to aid in identifying the origin of artifact material recovered, raw material samples were collected from areas that were...

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6. Chipped Lithic Artifacts

Martin J. Smith

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pp. 93-103

One pervasive aspect of Haudenosaunee archeology is the emphasis on the analysis of ceramics (Niemczycki 1984; Hayes 1980; MacNeish 1952). In contrast, other assemblages including chipped lithics (beyond projectile points) have been relatively neglected. By examining all lithic tools recovered from the Corey site, it is possible to discern a more complete range of...

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7. Ground Stone Artifacts

Macy O’Hearn

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pp. 104-109

Ground stone is considered to be any stone artifact that is not flaked during the course of manufacture, and includes non-chert artifacts produced by battering, grinding, abrading, smoothing, or polishing. In total, 167 ground stone artifacts were recovered over the two field seasons at the Corey site (table 7.1). Ground stone artifacts are not often included...

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8. Faunal Remains

April M. Beisaw

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pp. 110-139

This chapter describes and discusses the evidence of broad-spectrum animal exploitation at the Corey site, ranging in size from chipmunk to black bear. This analysis includes all recovered materials from both the 2003 excavation of the site midden and the 2005 excavation of a shorthouse and row of hearth/pit features. The hearths from the shorthouse were...

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9. Botanical Remains

Jack Rossen

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pp. 140-160

Detailed analysis of water flotation-collected plant remains from Haudenosaunee sites is rare indeed. This chapter discusses plant remains recovered from twenty flotation samples representing 170 liters of soil. Materials were collected from the three primary intact subplowzone site contexts: shorthouse hearths, posts, and midden (table 9.1). The result...

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10. Other Artifact Assemblages

Macy O’Hearn, Sarah Ward

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pp. 161-167

Other artifact assemblages include excavated materials that do not fall into the previously discussed categories. These objects range in function from production by-products to artifacts with utilitarian and possibly recreational and symbolic uses. A total of 277 miscellaneous artifacts (table 10.1) were recovered during the 2003 and 2005 field seasons at the Corey...

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11. Corey Village and the Cayuga World from the Tenth to the Sixteenth Centuries

Jack Rossen

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pp. 168-192

The Corey site excavations give insight into a small and intimate but dynamic sixteenth-century Cayuga village just prior to European contact. The outstanding and conspicuous feature of the site is its earthen double embankment and ditch that encompassed about one-fifth of the site boundary near the steep cliff above Paines Creek. The village contained...

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Epilogue: Challenging Dominant Archaeological Narratives of the Haudenosaunee

Jack Rossen

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pp. 193-204

I began working in Haudenosaunee archaeology and community activism at a midcareer point after twenty years as a South American archaeologist in Peru, Chile, and Argentina. In this sense I developed an outsider’s perspective on New York archaeology. During my work with the Cayuga people and their history, I found in central New York State a set of both deeply...

Works Cited

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pp. 205-228

Contributors

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pp. 229-232

Index

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pp. 233-236

Back Cover

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