Cover

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Title Page, Frontispiece, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Preface

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pp. xi-xii

Friendship, circumstance, and inclination all played important roles in my decision to write a history of colonial New Hampshire. A graduate school friend, Thomas J. Davis, asked me to write the New Hampshire volume for a series on the thirteen original states he helped plan as the historical editor at Charles Scribner and Sons. ...

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1. The Algonkians

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pp. 3-16

Sometime in the mid-1680s a small group of Pennacooks left their homeland in the upper Merrimack valley to join with fellow Indians to the northeast. They were accustomed to travel and had left their village many times before, but this departure meant more than the others: they had little expectation of returning. ...

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2. Adventurers, Planters, Émigrés

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pp. 17-38

Interactions among three distinct groups of individuals other than Algonkians shaped the pattern of settlement in early New Hampshire. Merchants and gentry from English seaports, especially those in the west country, provided capital for both exploration and the establishment of fishing and trading enterprises from which they hoped to gain a profit. ...

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3. Community Development, 1640–1680

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pp. 39-66

Contemporary Americans like to think of their early colonial ancestors as rugged individualists willing to risk property and life to free themselves from the arbitrary restraints of European society. In some ways the image is accurate: planters in the New World did have to be rugged to survive, they risked a great deal by migrating, and the majority, at least in New England, sought freedom from what they considered the growing oppressiveness of Anglican Church authority. ...

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4. The Royal Colony of New Hampshire

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pp. 67-80

Late in 1677 a committee of the English Privy Council received "an Account of Land lying between Massachusetts and the province of Maine" from two agents appointed by the Bay Colony General Court. The "Account" described the region as "a small tract of land, which... by reason of the scantiness of its accommodations contains in it no more than four plantations or towns, ...

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5. Twelve Years of Turmoil

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pp. 81-104

The new colony of New Hampshire was a risky undertaking for everyone involved. Authorities in England had no idea how well their attempt to strengthen imperial rule in a region dominated by Massachusetts would work. Virginia, the only other royal colony, had little in common with New Hampshire, and its apparent stability had recently been shattered by a series of internal rebellions. ...

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6. Testing Time: War and Politics in “Little New Hampshire”

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pp. 105-132

The next quarter century proved even more difficult for Englishmen who lived in New Hampshire. The Indian attacks against settlements in Dover during the summer of 1689 were the initial skirmishes of frontier warfare which continued well into the second decade of the eighteenth century. ...

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7. Patterns of Growth, 1715–1765

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pp. 133-164

New Hampshire grew rapidly in the half century after the Peace of Utrecht. Favorable boundary decisions and continued military success against the French and Native Americans expanded the area available for settlement. ...

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8. Social Institutions: Family, Church, and Community in a Changing World

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pp. 165-190

The basic structure of society shaped during the first century of European settlement in New Hampshire remained intact for the rest of the colonial period. Men and women continued to function in families, churches, and units of government of which the town was of greatest daily importance, ...

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9. Provincial Politics: The Wentworth Oligarchy

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pp. 191-216

When John Wentworth arrived in New Hampshire during the summer of 1767 to assume the governorship of the province, the selectmen of Londonderry published a welcoming address. They noted the "kind patronage" of Wentworth's grandfather John and his Uncle Benning who had preceded him in office, ...

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10. The Coming of Revolution

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pp. 217-244

Viewed from many perspectives, the decade following 1765 was much like the previous half century. Population continued to grow; by the start of the last quarter of the eighteenth century New Hampshire had nearly 75,000 inhabitants. More townships were settled, more churches established, more meeting houses constructed, and more acreage cleared for farming. ...

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Epilogue

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pp. 245-250

As far as the inhabitants of New Hampshire were concerned the colonial period came to an end with the Declaration of Independence. Officials in England, however, did not acknowledge independence until the formal signing of the Treaty of Paris in September 1783. ...

Bibliography

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pp. 251-268

Index

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pp. 269-279