Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

Visions of Civil War artillery often bring to mind such vaunted units as the Richmond Howitzers and the Rockbridge Artillery or such spectacular scenes as Colonel E. P. Alexander's artillery charge at Gettysburg. Few initially think of the Confederate barrage on the first day at Shiloh, although it was the largest in American history up to that point. ...

read more

1. Birth of the Western Long Arm

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-14

During the spring and summer of 1861, Tennessee governor Isham H. Harris pieced together the provisional army of Tennessee. Under the Army Bill of May 6, the state called for fifty-five thousand volunteers, with twenty-five thousand of them to be armed and the remainder to be held in reserve. ...

read more

2. "The Battery Was the Common Target"

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 15-21

By November 1861 General Albert Sidney Johnston, commanding the immense Department No.2, which stretched from the Alleghenies to the Ozarks, had established a line across the southern border of Kentucky. Lieutenant General Leonidas Polk's corps anchored the left at Columbus, on the Mississippi River, ...

read more

3. Missed Opportunities

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 22-37

Throughout March 1862, Corinth, Mississippi, bustled with activity. Troops from across the western Confederacy massed there in a determined effort to arrest and roll back the relentless Union drive. During the previous weeks General Beauregard had revamped the army, including establishing guidelines for the artillery: ...

read more

4. "Enough of Kentucky"

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 38-51

Beauregard's shattered army fell back to Corinth, where it recuperated and prepared for the expected advance of the combined Union force, now under Major General Henry Halleck, that totaled 108,000 troops. Even with the addition of Earl Van Dorn's twenty-thousand-man Army of the West, recently arrived from Arkansas, ...

read more

5. Failed Lessons: Stones River

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 52-69

Even as his retreating army plodded through Cumberland Gap, Bragg envisioned an offensive in middle Tennessee. Bragg sold the idea to the Richmond government when he was summoned there in late October. Soon his four divisions boarded cars at Chattanooga for the Murfreesboro front. ...

read more

6. "All Hands Fixing Up the Battery"

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 70-79

During the early days of January 1863, Bragg committed his weary army to a defensive line along the Duck River in south central Tennessee. Polk's corps wintered at Shelbyville and Hardee's at Wartrace, with army headquarters at Tullahoma. In early April, in an effort to obtain more pastureland and forage, Polk's batteries, ...

read more

7. Of Officers and Organization: The Artillery Infrastructure

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 80-89

On the surface, it appeared as though Bragg successfully welded together an efficient artillery command structure. His chiefs were young, knowledgeable, and well educated. Yet, although several of them were West Pointers with regular army experience, none had any combat experience or training in the handling of groups of guns. ...

read more

8. A Fateful Autumn

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 90-111

Throughout the winter and spring of 1863, the Army of Tennessee enjoyed a protracted period of inactivity along the Duck River. Captain Overton Barret enjoyed "excellent health, as all in my company are:" he wrote his mother on June 11. "You have no idea how much more comfortable an artillery captain lives than a colonel of a regiment:" he continued, ...

read more

9. Artillery Disaster at Missionary Ridge

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 112-132

Lieutenant Andrew Neal of McCants's Florida Battery jubilantly wrote that the Southerners had "whipped the Yankees badly" on the banks of Chickamauga Creek. "We have only to press them to reap the victory:" Forrest's cavalry pushed to the outskirts of Chattanooga, and Morton's horse battery commenced shelling one of the forts. ...

read more

10. Reorganization at Dalton

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 133-149

The battles around Chattanooga had exhausted the Army of Tennessee. Rest and recuperation would be required. Fortunately for the army's temporary commander, Lieutenant General William J. Hardee, the Federals did not launch a December offensive as they had the previous year at Murfreesboro. ...

read more

11. Boots and Saddles: Retreat to Atlanta

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 150-167

The ground was covered with a mild frost on the unpleasantly crisp morning of May 2, 1864. In the camp of Hotchkiss's battalion, a bugler sounded "Boots and Saddles" as the men began stirring about and harnessing their animals. As the battalion rattled toward the drill ground for morning maneuvers, a courier suddenly galloped up and ordered it back to camp. ...

read more

12. "Those Brave Cannoneers"

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 168-177

Artillerists, as well as the entire army, viewed Johnston's removal with mixed reactions. Captain Key wrote that "every man looked sad and disheartened," and a private in Guibor's battery remembered that "the soldiers were very much depressed." Lieutenant Neal, however, confided that "I cannot regard it as a calamity:" ...

read more

13. The Final Campaign

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 178-194

On September 19, 1864, Hood moved the battered Army of Tennessee to Palmetto Station on the Macon Railroad. Never had the situation appeared so bleak. Shortages of food, clothing, shoes, and ammunition intensified. George Jones noted that the horses in Stanford's battery "seem to be affected with a curious disease." ...

Appendix A: Organizational Tables

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 195-208

Appendix B: Battery Profiles

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 209-214

Appendix C: Prewar Military Backgrounds

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 215-216

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 217-250

Bibliographical Essay

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 251-260

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 261-268