Cover

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Title page, Series page, Copyright, Acknowledgments, Dedication

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Contents

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Part 1: The Necropastoral; On Being Posthumous; Bug Time

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Strange Meetings in the Necropastoral: Owen, Hawkey, Césaire

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pp. 3-20

I give the name “necropastoral” to the manifestation of the infectiousness, anxiety, and contagion occultly present in the hygienic borders of the classical pastoral. For all the pastoral’s shoring up of separations, and despite the cordon sanitaire it purports...

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On Being Posthumous: Necropastoral Economies in Jack Smith, Andy Warhol, and Yi Sang

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pp. 21-40

The pastoral, like the occult, has always been a fraud, a counterfeit, an invention, an anachronism. However, as with the occult, and as with Art itself, the fraudulence of the pastoral is in direct proportion to its uncanny powers. A double of the urban, but...

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Bug Time: Chitinous Necropastoral Hypertime against the Future

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pp. 41-46

1. A prescient book, prophetic like an ancient Greek oracle who, drugged on her tripod, could only look backward: Toxic Archipelago: A History of Industrial Disease in Japan. Here Brett L. Walker introduces the notion that insects live on different time scales...

Part 2: Leslie Scalapino; CAConrad and Chelsey Minnis; Kim Hyesoon and Don Mee Choi; Harryette Mullen; Hannah Weiner; Translation, the Filthiest Medium of All

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Publicity and Obscurity: On Leslie Scalapino’s Dahlia’s Iris

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pp. 49-54

Publicity and obscurity for contemporary writers are not necessarily exterior to writing itself—that is, such things are but are not only a matter of marketing. Rather, publicity and obscurity are matters of genre and style, revenants and precedents present...

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Art-trash: On CAConrad and Chelsey Minnis

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pp. 55-65

As these epigraphs so clearly emblematize, Art is asphyxiation; annihilation; anachronism; inebriation; something “cut-down”; something shoplifted; like trash, it makes more of itself; like the past, it should go away but it never does. Like a cough...

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Another Litter: On the Black Arts of Kim Hyesoon and Don Mee Choi

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pp. 66-82

Kim Hyesoon is a distinguished and influential Korean Feminist poet and critic. Her critical and pragmatic approaches to Feminism have had a direct impact on the lives of men, women, and especially children in Korea, and her creative work enjoys global...

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Muse & Drudge & Art’s Ampersand

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pp. 83-95

Harryette Mullen’s Muse & Drudge is, by any measure, and beyond measure, à Outrance, a paradoxical, nonbinary text, a text that will not settle down into the absolute values of zeros and ones but generates doubling, impossible specters.
This phenomenon...

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Disabled Texts and the Threat of Hannah Weiner

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pp. 96-107

1. In our “Manifesto of the Disabled Text,” published in the winter 2008 issue of Catherine Taylor’s /nor, Johannes Göransson and I argued in favor of disabled texts, texts that reject the “compulsory able-bodiedness” of contemporary text culture...

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Translation, the Slavish Mold, the Filthiest Medium Alive: With Special Reference to Matthew Barney, Andy Warhol, and Divine

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pp. 108-114

1. What regime does a work of Art appeal to? Does the work of Art appeal to a sensory, generic, or interpretive regime? Is that appeal “abject”? “slavish”?
2. Let us take translation as an example of a work of Art. For translation works on extant materials...

Part 3: Eye Wound Media

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Eye Wound Media

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pp. 117-150

1. I was looking at the cover of Prigov’s Fifty Drops of Blood in the Ugly Duckling edition; the cover features an eye-shaped cutout through which splashes of red blood may be seen strewing what looks like the exposed tissue of the page beneath.
2. The eye wound...

Part 4: The Future of Poetry

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The “Future” of “Poetry”

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pp. 153-157

1. Becoming a mother made me a goth. Becoming a mother, and nearly dying in the process, and wondering for ten months if the body inside me is alive or dead, and, concomitantly, if I would also kill myself if I learned it was dead, then holding it...

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Expenditure: Or, why I’m going to die trying

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pp. 158-163

1. My nonrealist writing is exhausting. It exhausts the sentences. It has no good measure. It starts out formal (interested in genre) but it distends form and makes it sag.
2. When Bataille analyzes society, he divides it into two parts: the productive...

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The Mask of Art

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pp. 164-170

1. The 2011 removal of the four-minute David Wojnarowicz video A Fire in My Belly from the Smithsonian in response to a protest by the Catholic League and the threat of defunding by Representative John Boehner made me return to all things...

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On Influence

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pp. 171-175

1. I want to begin by suggesting my discomfort with the conventions of discussing literary influence. I want to suggest that influence need not come from literary forebears, elders, teachers, or even people. For me this notion of influence, regardless...

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Loser Occult

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pp. 176-180

Outside the campus bookstore a few weeks ago, I glimpsed a white minivan with a green bumper sticker reading “I miss Ronald Reagan” in a big goopy white Snoopy toothpaste font. Good grief, Charlie Brown! The woman driving this minivan stood in...

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Arga warga: On the Doubled Ambience of Violence & Art

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pp. 181-188

1. I was recently reading the riddley, apocalyptic novel-song Riddley Walker by Russell Hoban. This tale, one slowly gathers as one limps or lips along with our enriddled, walking protagonist, is set in a new Iron Age thousands of years after a nuclear holocaust...