Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-xiv

Successful book projects have multiple origins. They meander for years, are dormant for lengthy periods, shelved for other endeavors, only to reappear much later in contexts that, in hindsight, were unimaginable at the outset. This book is no exception. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-34

In his magnum opus The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined, Steven Pinker confesses to us that as a sophomore holding a summer assistant job in an animal research laboratory in 1975, he inadvertently killed a rat by doing what the professor asked him to—“throw the rat in the box, start the timers, and go home for the night.” ...

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One. What Is Breed Rescue?

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pp. 35-63

What is a breed specific rescue group? The broadest definition encapsulates any individual or group that assists in the placement of homeless dogs of a particular breed. For the purposes of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), a rescue group is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt charitable organization, although not all rescue groups, ...

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Two. The Overwhelming Predominance of Women in the World of Dog Rescue: The State of Michigan as a Representative Case Study Enhanced by Relevant Interview Data from Rescuers Elsewhere

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pp. 64-79

Without any question, women are the predominant participants in dog rescue. A quick perusal of the gender of the sixty individuals listed in Appendix D who have been long-standing dog rescue workers whom we interviewed for our study reveals the huge overrepresentation of women among this group. ...

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Three. The Topography of Breed Specific Dog Registrations from 1960 to 2009: An Important Contextual Framework for Rescue

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pp. 80-106

Clearly, the phenomenon of breed specific canine rescue commenced in a particular context. People choosing dogs as pets—including those whom they obtain through rescue—does not happen randomly or in a vacuum. Whereas we delineated the human dimension of rescue in this book’s introduction and its first two chapters, ...

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Four. The History of Golden Retriever Rescue as a Case Study of Breed Specific Rescue

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pp. 107-154

A person looking for a Golden Retriever rescue in 1979 would have discovered that such a thing simply did not exist in the United States. Thirty-five years later, there are over one hundred such groups in the country, covering all fifty states, not infrequently featuring multiple rescues located in the same city. ...

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Five. Regionalism in the Breed Rescue World

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pp. 155-174

Rescue groups are not created in a vacuum. The material conditions of the environment in which a rescue group is formed have a profound impact on the ways in which it will develop and behave. Investigations into regional variations are critical for determining the true differences among canine rescue groups, ...

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Six. Rescue Groups and External Relationships

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pp. 175-202

Like all organizations, breed specific rescue groups exist in a wider milieu. The act of rescuing necessarily involves obtaining dogs from individuals who are not rescue group members and placing them with other individuals who are also not members of the rescue group and often not even part of the larger world of animal rescue well beyond the rescue focused on one canine breed. ...

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Seven. Communication, Networking, and Sustenance

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pp. 203-238

The previous chapter discussed the relationships rescue groups can have with external organizations. This chapter will analyze the mechanisms by which rescue groups engage in these relationships. In particular, we explore answers to the following questions: How do rescue groups communicate and network with external organizations? ...

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Eight. The Golden/Labrador Retriever Comparison

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pp. 239-258

The information presented in the previous chapters demonstrate the large diversity of breed rescues. They come in all sizes, from very large thoroughly professionalized organizations to small operations often run by just a few persons, even, on occasion, merely one committed individual. Rescues vary in their organizational philosophies as well as approaches on how best to serve their needy clientele; ...

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Nine. The Unique Case of Greyhound Rescue

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pp. 259-275

In the previous chapters on breed specific dog rescues, we omitted mention of Greyhound rescue. But the influence of Greyhound racing on Greyhound rescue dictates that a separate and additional presentation be given this topic because Greyhound rescue represents a phenomenon that is quite different in its origins and logic from the breed rescues featured in previous chapters. ...

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Ten. Changing Discourse of Compassion within Breed Specific Rescue in the United States: “Good” Breeds versus “Bad” Breeds: The Case of Pit Bulls

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pp. 276-296

Let us begin this chapter with an important clarification of the nomenclature that we employed in the chapter’s subtitle and that we will use throughout the text: Nothing can be further from our normative orientation than classifying dogs of any breed as “good” and “bad.” As will be clear to the reader, we strongly reject any such categorizations. ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 297-306

Way beyond the rescuing of breed specific dogs, which has been the topic of this study, the discourse of compassion is reaching new, previously unimaginable levels with respect to the animals it affects. Of course, there have been thousands of cat rescues for many years, and in our research we encountered the beginning proliferation of bunny rescues.2 ...

Appendix A: Data from Our Survey of Michigan Rescues

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pp. 307-310

Appendix B: Breed Specific Canine Rescue Survey

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pp. 311-328

Appendix C: Interview Questionnaire

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pp. 329-332

Appendix D: Interview Subjects

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pp. 333-336

Index

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pp. 337-348