Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title page, Series page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-ix

List of Figures

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. x

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

Thanks are due first and foremost to Peter Richerson, who has been my good friend and colleague since I came to the University of California, Davis, in 1980. Pete encouraged me over the many years that went into this book, read the manuscript in all its many versions, and made comments...

read more

1. Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-14

On August 29, 1911, a Yahi man who would later be given the name Ishi, turned up at a rural slaughterhouse in the northern Sacramento Valley, California, having lived the last three years entirely alone, the thirty or so years before that in a band of not more than fifteen or twenty...

read more

2. California in Broad Evolutionary Perspective

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 15-28

It is easy to place the peoples of California in broad evolutionary perspective: they are hunter-gatherers. Excepting a few groups along the Colorado River, the peoples of California made their living exclusively by hunting, fishing, and gathering indigenous, nondomesticated plants...

read more

3. The Evolution of Intensive Hunting and Gathering in Eastern California

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 29-58

The contact landscape of aboriginal western North America was mainly shaped by the emergence and spread of intensive hunting and gathering, often at the expense of agriculture. This evolutionary trajectory is undeniable in the Great Basin and Southwest where, having outcompeted, at...

read more

4. The Privatization of Food

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 59-94

Jorgensen (1980: 224–225) has called attention to the singular lack of social integration and political development that distinguishes much of the ethnographic Great Basin and California (indeed, much of ethnographic western North America). He attributed this to the stubborn...

read more

5. Plant Intensification West of the Sierra Crest

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 95-118

Events leading to the intensification and storage of plant foods west of the Sierra Nevada paralleled those in Eastern California, developing as a consequence of social fragmentation and shrinking group size triggered upon the arrival of the bow and arrow. I have already presented...

read more

6. Patrilineal Bands, Sibs, and Tribelets

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 119-148

A key difference between plant intensification east versus west of the Sierra Nevada was that east of the Sierra plant intensification centered on pinyon, the unpredictability of which precluded the holding of territories. Intensification west of the Sierra focused on the much more...

read more

7. Back to the Band: Bilateral Tribelets and Bands

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 149-178

Nearly 70% of California groups (25 of 36) organized as tribelets observed bilateral (nonunilineal) descent. Jorgensen (1980: 136, 181, 194) argued that virtually all of these tribelets had once been patrilineal but later expanded their descent rule to include the mother’s as well as...

read more

8. Money

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 179-198

Intensification in hunter-gatherer California was incentivized by changes in the economy and circulation of resources. Material conditions were important but ultimately not causal, certainly not in any straightforward way, environment being at turns both helpful (plant abundance, e.g...

read more

9. The Evolution of Orderly Anarchy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 199-222

Throughout this volume I have been pursuing a version of what my colleague Peter Richerson calls the orderly anarchy hypothesis, that productive social interaction and cooperation is possible between individuals, families, and groups who concede no common political bond...

read more

10. Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 223-242

I started in Chapter 1 with the relatively simple assertion that the ethnography of California contradicts conventional wisdom that the natural course of cultural evolution always leads from hunting and gathering to agriculture, and from less to ever more complex and hierarchical...

Glossary

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 243-248

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 249-280

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 281-286

Maps

pdf iconDownload PDF