Series page, Title page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Plainsword

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-2

Across the eastern Great Plains lie a number of small cities that serve as regional business centers, the state capital, or home to a state university. They are known for a low cost of living, low crime rates, and high quality of life, and have populations between 100,000 and 250,000. They also have among the highest percentages of...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-18

Jacob Giebelhaus, Charles Stabler, and Tran Bai Si were all drawn to Lincoln, Nebraska, by opportunities to “materially or spiritually” improve themselves and their families.¹ Giebelhaus departed Norka, Russia—an ethnically German settlement—at the turn of the twentieth century; Stabler moved from...

read more

1. Local Knowledge and National Perspectives: Ethnicities and the Mainstream in Lincoln

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 19-43

Th e city of Lincoln sits amid the drift hills of southeastern Nebraska just on the wet side of the ninety-eighth parallel.¹ Today, it hosts 258,000 residents of Indigenous, Asian, African, Pacific Island, and European descents. Its general character, however, has always been “American.” Like many communities...

read more

2. Life in the Russian Bottoms: Community Building and Identity Transformation among Germans from Russia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 44-90

Henry J. Amen was born in 1876 in Frank, Russia, an ethnically German agricultural colony on the Volga River. He immigrated to Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1888, where he apprenticed with an uncle before opening his “main street” grocery in the heart of the South Russian Bottoms in 1902. At this “hustling...

read more

3. From the Big Village to the Urban Village: Omahas in Lincoln

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 91-127

Already in the prime of their lives, Charles D. and Elizabeth Saunsoci Stabler migrated from Omaha Nation—Umónhonnzhon thón—to Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1941. Accepting a recruiter’s off er to work on the Burlington Railroad during World War II, they remained in the Capital City throughout...

read more

4. Vietnamese Urban Villagers in Lincoln: Clustered Communities and Flexible Identities

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 129-171

Maria Dan Vu fl ed Vung-Tau, Vietnam, as a boat person in 1979. Already married with two daughters, she took refuge in Malaysia and then in Indonesia before her harrowing journey ended in Boston in 1983, when she was reunited with her husband, Anton, a former South Vietnamese army officer...

read more

5. Comparisons: Identities and Communities during the Long Twentieth Century

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 173-190

If food “is everyone’s first language,” then Lincoln in the twenty-first century hosts a lively dialogue.¹ Food is not a frivolous cultural artifact. By discussing dishes as commonplace as soup, 130 years of long-standing ethnic practices that celebrate divergent identities can be accessed by all residents of the...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 191-255

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 257-265

Photographs

pdf iconDownload PDF