Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Director's Foreword

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pp. vii-vii

On a crisp, predawn morning in March 2003, the Enola Gay began its final journey. The airplane’s forward fuselage, still separated from its after section and wings after more than 40 years, rode a trailer out of storage in Silver Hill, Maryland, and blended in with early rush hour traffic. ...

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Curator's Viewpoint

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pp. ix-x

The union of the Boeing B-29 Superfortress with the atomic bomb not only contributed to the defeat of Japan, but also established the foundation of strategic aviation in American Cold War policy for the following four and a half decades. ...

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Author's Perspective

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pp. xi-xii

The Enola Gay is a historic aircraft, representing both the world’s entry into the atomic age and an important step in the development of U.S. military aviation. It is also the largest combat aircraft in the collection of the National Air and Space Museum. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

This book was produced under the direction of Ted A. Maxwell, associate director of the National Air and Space Museum. Several members of the museum staff provided invaluable assistance in the research, writing, and editing of this manuscript and in photograph selection, ...

Glossary

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pp. xv-xvi

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1. The B-29 Superfortress

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pp. 1-12

The B-29 Superfortress was the most effective bomber of any nation to see combat in World War II. The aircraft was developed as a strategic bomber to carry out long-range, high-altitude, daylight bombing attacks. ...

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2. The Enola Gay

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pp. 13-22

Aircraft serial number 44–86292—later named Enola Gay—was delivered to the U.S. Army Air Forces (AAF) by the Martin aircraft factory in Omaha, Nebraska, on May 18, 1945.1 By that time B-29 production lines were working around the clock at the Boeing-operated plants in Wichita, Kansas, ...

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3. The Mission

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pp. 23-42

As the officers and enlisted men of the 509th Composite Group settled into their tents and Quonset huts at North Field on Tinian, Colonel Paul Tibbets began an intense training program for his B-29 flight crews and his group staff. North Field had four parallel runways, each 8,500 feet long, reputed to be the longest operational runways then in existence. ...

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4. B-29 Postscripts

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pp. 43-58

The Japanese message accepting the terms of the Potsdam Declaration was announced publicly by President Truman on the evening of August 14 in Washington. It was about 10 A.M. on August 15 in the Marianas. That evening the B-29s crews and their ground personnel in the Marianas celebrated the end of the war. ...

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5. The Artifact

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pp. 59-64

The Enola Gay is the largest military aircraft artifact preserved by the National Air and Space Museum. It has also been one of the largest and most complex restoration projects in the history of aviation. ...

Appendix A: Enola Gay Chronology

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pp. 65-66

Appendix B: B-29 Models and Variants

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pp. 67-68

Appendix C: B-29 Characteristics

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pp. 69-78

Notes

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pp. 79-82

Bibliography

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pp. 83-84

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About the Author

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p. 85

Norman Polmar is an analyst, consultant, and author specializing in aviation, naval, and intelligence issues. He has written or coauthored more than 30 books and numerous articles in these fields. In 1997–1998, he held the Ramsey Chair of Naval Aviation History at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. ...