Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xv

This book is the culmination of a personal and intellectual obsession with Jaffa that has lasted well over a decade. In my case this “Jaffa-mania” stems from my own quotidian experience of living in the city for almost three decades, prior to fieldwork...

Note on Transliteration and Translation

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p. xvii

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Introduction: Contrived Coexistence: Relational Histories of Urban Mix in Israel

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pp. 1-26

On the eve of the Al-Aqsa Intifada, in what would be his last interview with an Israeli journalist, Edward Said proposed a highly perceptive reading of Palestinian-Israeli entangled histories: “When you think about it, when you think about Jew...

Part One: Beyond Methodological Nationalism: Communal Formations and Ambivalent Belonging

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1. Spatial Relationality: Theorizing Space and Sociality in Jewish-Arab “Mixed Towns”

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pp. 29-66

The large-scale protest demonstrations staged by the Palestinian citizens of Israel throughout the country in the first two weeks of October 2000, now widely known as “the October 2000 events,” did not bypass Jaffa. For a few days in early October, Palestinian youngsters...

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2. The Bridled “Bride of Palestine”: Urban Orientalism and the Zionist Quest for Place

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pp. 67-96

The gentrified city is a cultural space of unyielding desire for the quality of life lost in the metropolitan chaos or in the emptiness of suburban sprawl. Imagining a new authentic lifestyle in the erstwhile disinvested yet quaint “inner city” is bound to cause considerable...

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3. The “Mother of the Stranger”: Palestinian Presence and the Ambivalence of Sumud

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pp. 97-132

In the late 1990s, on the crumbling wall of Jaffa’s Kazakhane Muslim graveyard overlooking the Mediterranean, faded graffiti comprising a drawing of an orange reads in black and orange colors, “Jaffa, the city of the sad orange that will smile again...

Part Two: Sharing Place or Consuming Space: The Neoliberal City

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4. Inner Space and High Ceilings: Agents and Ideologies of Ethnogentrification

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pp. 135-176

In front of a newly built cubist construction on 60th Street in ‘Ajami, a large and colorful marketing sign promising “authentic and luxurious housing” read, “Living in Jaffa is a matter of style. Investing in Jaffa is a matter of wisdom....

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5. To Buy or Not to Be: Trespassing the Gated Community

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pp. 177-208

Walking with a group of Palestinian and Jewish guests, we silently crossed the iron gate of the luxurious gated community. Slowly, we traversed the premises toward the western viewpoint overlooking the Jaffa port. Enjoying the breathtaking...

Part Three: Being and Belonging in the Binational City: A Phenomenology of the Urban

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6. Escaping the Mythscape: Tales of Intimacy and Violence

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pp. 211-242

Safiyya Dabbah and Hanna Swissa, two elderly neighbors living in the Jaffa C. (Yafo Gimel) neighborhood, meet daily over breakfast. Safiyya, a Muslim woman in her nineties, was widowed thirty years ago and today lives on her own in a dilapidated shanty...

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7. Situational Radicalism and Creative Marginality: The “Arab Spring” and Jaffa’s Counterculture

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pp. 243-283

One of the striking features of the “Arab uprisings” is their cascading effect on social movements worldwide. The rapid diffusion and mimetic circulation of their core revolutionary principles to markedly different political contexts throughout the Middle East...

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Conclusion: The City of the Forking Paths: Imagining the Futures of Binational Urbanism

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pp. 284-302

In the agonistic landscape of Israel/Palestine, no place has been more continuously inflected by the tension between intimate proximity and visceral violence than ethnically “mixed” towns. The immanent ambivalence of the binational encounter...

Notes

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pp. 303-328

References

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pp. 329-342

Index

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pp. 343-363