Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Preface

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pp. ix-xii

Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

List of Abbreviations of Works by Jean-Luc Marion

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pp. xv-xvi

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Introduction: Givenness, Saturated Phenomena, Negative Certainties, and Hermeneutics

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pp. 1-24

As the subtitle of Being Given indicates, Marion’s philosophy can be defined as a “phenomenology of givenness.” The term “givenness” featured already in his earlier preparatory work Reduction and Givenness where he first developed the notion of a “third reduction” to givenness. ...

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1. Historical Events and Historical Research

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pp. 25-50

Marion uses the term “event” in two different but closely connected senses in his work, especially in his presentation in Being Given. On the one hand, he speaks of the event as a characteristic of all given phenomena: phenomena give themselves as events, they are “being given.” ...

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2. Art and the Artist

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pp. 51-77

Marion has written fairly extensively on art, although this topic has not been discussed much in the secondary literature on his work.1 One of his early works, The Crossing of the Visible, is an extended reflection on the status of the image in art and contemporary culture. In his later writings, the work of art occupies a central place as the second type of saturated phenomenon, saturated according to quality. ...

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3. Nature and Flesh

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pp. 78-99

Instead of examining a phenomenon that Marion already depicts as saturated, this chapter focuses on one he does not discuss. I will suggest that nature and various nonhuman beings can appear to us as saturated phenomena, both on Marion’s own terms and in the sense in which I have argued in respect to the first two types of phenomena examined: ...

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4. Love and Violence

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pp. 100-123

The lover “declares his love as one declares war” (EP, 79; PE, 129). So insists Marion repeatedly in his investigation into the nature of the erotic phenomenon. War, of course, is here “only” a metaphor illustrating the absolute commitment of the lover. Yet the fact that this analogy is used several times throughout The Erotic Phenomenon seems to indicate that it is not insignificant. ...

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5. Gift and Sacrifice

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pp. 124-145

Marion is maybe most well-known as a philosopher of the gift. Already in a widely read article, titled “Sketch of a Phenomenological Concept of the Gift,” he attempted to illuminate the topic of the gift.1 His major phenomenological work, Being Given, explores phenomenology as fundamentally about “givenness” and includes an entire section titled “The Gift” (part 2). ...

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6. Prayer and Sainthood

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pp. 146-169

Prayer is a fairly prominent topic in Marion’s writings, although it is not a concern addressed much by the secondary literature on his work.1 Already the early distinction between idol and icon in God without Being is to a large extent about prayer or worship, about the human approach to the divine that can be expressed in idolatrous adoration or authentic prayer before an icon. ...

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7. Eucharist and Sacrament

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pp. 170-192

Marion has explored sacraments and especially the Eucharist throughout his work, beginning with his rather controversial treatment in God without Being and culminating with two accounts in Le croire pour le voir. Why is the Eucharist so important for Marion? On the one hand, it is obviously a central liturgical rite that particularly defines Christian identity. ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 193-204

In this book I have examined Marion’s proposal of saturated phenomena and argued that Marion focuses too exclusively on their absolute excess and almost complete lack of context. I have suggested, instead, that phenomena are given in degrees of saturation and not only in the two or three degrees Marion indicates, poverty and saturation, but instead in a whole variety and range of degrees. ...

Notes

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pp. 205-250

Bibliography

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pp. 251-270

Index

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pp. 271-280