Cover

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Frontmatter

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Also in this series

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Title Page

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p. iii

Copyright Page

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p. iv

Contents

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p. vii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xi

Surveying the present state of scholarship in Renaissance rhetoric, James J. Murphy gloomily counts "a thousand and one neglected authors."l While modern scholars are grateful for some of the more ambitious microfilm and facsimile reprint series, these editions seldom have an adequate scholarly apparatus, if any, and thus are of limited value. Beyond Wilbur ...

Note on the Texts

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pp. xiii-xiv

1. Thomas Hobbes's A Briefe of the Art of Rhetorique

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Introduction

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pp. 1-32

The origin of Thomas Hobbes's A Briefe of the Art of Rhetorique (1637), the first English translation of Aristotle's Rhetoric, is the Latin exercise book of William Cavendish (1617-1684), the third earl of Devonshire, whom Hobbes was employed to tutor in 1631.1 After graduation from Magdalen Hall, Oxford, in 1608, Hobbes had tutored ...

A Briefe of the Art of Rhetorique

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p. 33

Hobbes's Table of Contents

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pp. 35-38

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Book 1

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pp. 39-67

Wee see that all men naturally are able in some sort to accuse and excuse: some by chance; but some by method. This method may be discovered: and to discover method is all one with teaching an Art. If this Art consisted in Criminations only, and the skill to stirre up ...

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Book 2

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pp. 69-105

Of beleefe proceeding from our Invention that part which consisteth in proofe, is already spoken of. The other two parts follow: whereof one ariseth from the manners of the speaker; the other from the passions of the Hearer. The Principles, Colours, or Common Opinions, upon which a mans beleefe is grounded concerning the ...

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Book 3

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pp. 107-128

Three things being necessary to an Oration namely Proofe, Elocution and Disposition; we have done with the first, and shall speake of the other two in that which followes. As for Action, or Pronuntiation, so much as is necessary ...

Bernard Lamy's The Art of Speaking

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Introduction

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pp. 131-164

When De L'Art de Parler appeared anonymously in Paris in 1675, Bernard Lamy (1640�1715) had good reason to conceal his authorship. As a member of the Congregation of the Oratory of Jesus and a teacher of philosophy in the College of Anjou, he had openly espoused Cartesian principles despite ...

The Art of Speaking

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p. 165

Lamy's Table of Contents

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pp. 167-174

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The Preface

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pp. 175-179

Our common Idea of Rhetorick is this, That to speak Eloquently, it suffices to cram our Memory with such Precepts as are prescrib'd by it. In this opinion, several People read with great eagerness those Books which are writ of that Subject; but after all their pains and assiduity finding their improvement but small, and themselves little more ...

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Part 1

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pp. 180-211

We may speak with our Eyes, and our Fingers, and make use of the motions of those parts to express the Idea's which are present to our Minds, and the Affections of our Wills: But this way of Speaking is not1 only imperfect, but troublesom. We cannot without much labour express by our Eyes, or our ...

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Part 2

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pp. 213-250

The Mind of Man is so fertile, all the Languages in the World are too barren to express its fecundity. It turns things so many ways, and represents things with so many different faces, that 'tis impossible to contrive words for all the forms of our thoughts: The ordinary terms are not always adequate, they are either ...

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Part 3

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pp. 251-302

The Rules which we have hitherto given, in relation to the Art of Speaking, regard only the manner of expressing our Thoughts, which are the Soul of Discourse. Letters that compose the Words, by their resemblance, are the Body of Discourse, as we have said before. We must take pains now to form this Body, that is to say, to range the ...

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Part 4

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pp. 303-341

We have observed that Words do not give the same Idea of things that they signifie, and that to make us understand the form of our Thoughts, we ought to use among our Terms such as represent their true lineaments, and their natural colours, that is to say, such as awaken in the minds of other ...

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A Discourse, in which is given an Idea of the Art of Persuasion

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pp. 343-377

Though the Arts of Speaking and Perswading are both comprehended under the name of Rhetorick by several great Masters, yet it is not to be deny'd but there is great difference betwixt them. Every man who speaks well, has not the secret of working upon the Affections, or working to his side, such ...

Index to A Brief of the Art of Rhetorique

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pp. 379-389

Index to The Art of Speaking

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pp. 391-408

Author Bio

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p. 410

Back Cover

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p. 428