Cover

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Series page, Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

I am grateful to many friends, relatives, and research assistants for helping me complete this book. Although I take responsibility for the content and ideas, I owe my insights to several mentors: Professor Kari Dehli, OISE-University of Toronto, Professor Sherene Razack, OISE-University of Toronto, ...

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Introduction: Transnational Identities and Religious-Political Modernities

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pp. 1-45

Growing up in Pakistan in the 1960s and 1970s, many of us from purdah- observing families (those practicing women’s seclusion), spent our girlhood energies challenging our parents’ attempts to impose the burqa (the head and/or face-covering veil now popularly known as hijab).1 ...

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1. Newly Emerging Subjects: Feminism, Islamic Feminism, and Post-Islamic Feminism

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pp. 46-69

Many Muslim women, such as me, acquired feminist consciousness through the discourses of global liberal feminism in its local manifestations, and were reoriented toward the convoluted relationship of “modern” and “Islamic” through transnationally dispersed theories of postcolonialism and poststructuralism. ...

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2. The Spaces of the Public-Religious

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pp. 70-112

Juda ho din siyasat se / to reh jati hai changezi [politics without faith is tyranny]. Invoking the authority of the poet-philosopher Allama Mohammed Iqbal, a key woman leader of the Jamaat-e-Islami, who I will refer to by the pseudonym Samina, responded to my request to explain her understanding of the term “politics.” ...

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3. Politics of Morality

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pp. 113-135

Feminist genealogies of Muslim women’s movements in South Asia generally ignore the possibility of women’s engagement with Islamism. This is odd, since twentieth-century Islamism, like modern Muslim nationalism, is a product of the same period of mass mobilizations and large-scale anticolonial protest during which ideas about women, nation, and secular nationalism are seen to have developed in Muslim South Asia.1 ...

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4. Vanguard of a New Modernity?:Cultural Politics in a Postcolonial State

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pp. 136-169

Like members of Islamist groups involved in electoral politics and national debates elsewhere, Jamaat women are organizing groups of people and enhancing their participation in electoral and claim-making activities related to what is considered the modern public sphere.1 ...

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5. Gender and Developmentand Its Discontents: Jamaat Women and the “Woman Question” in Pakistan

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pp. 170-207

The Jamaat women leaders cited here were addressing a public event that I attended in Karachi on International Women’s Day in March 2005 organized by the Women’s Commission of the Jamaat-e-Islami. The themes reiterated were not extraordinary for a women’s event in Pakistan: ...

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6. To Forbid Evil and Enjoin Virtue:Creating Moral Citizens

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pp. 208-249

Many contemporary Islamic reform and renewal movements derive legitimacy for their community-building projects from the Quranic injunction, “amr bil maruf wa nahin anil munkir” (to enjoin good and forbid evil), a verse of the Surah Al Imran.1 The relationship between the individual and community at the heart of this injunction is also central to many debates about individual versus community, ...

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7. Conclusion: Gendered Selves, Modernist Trajectories, and Community Building

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pp. 250-266

In this book I have attempted to bring under intellectual and political scrutiny the possibilities and limitations of the Islamist project for women in contemporary Pakistan. First, I have argued that Jamaat women’s productive use of their social class and cultural location enables them to challenge the dominance of liberal/secular social and political groups and to claim the leadership of working-class rural and urban women. ...

Appendix. An Islamic Charter of Women’s Rights

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pp. 267-270

Glossary

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pp. 271-276

Bibliography

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pp. 277-290

Index

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pp. 291-304