Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Preface: Finding Women at Boeing

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pp. xi-xvi

This book began with a single box at the Boeing Historical Archives that was marked “Women at Boeing.” In 2000 I had the truly wonderful opportunity to work for a year as an intern at the Boeing Historical Archives. Most visitors to the archives wanted to know about technology and airplane parts, but I was intrigued by the social and cultural history contained in that box,...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xvii-xxii

I relied on many people over the years as I worked on this project. I am grateful to Michael Lombardi and Thomas Lubbesmeyer of the Boeing Historical Archives for providing me with an introduction to archival research and Boeing’s rich history. Kelby Fletcher, Mary Monschein, and Cindy Lin of the Peterson, Young, and Putra law firm provided vital documentation...

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Introduction: The Boeing Family

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pp. 1-26

In November 2013 Boeing leaders presented a labor contract to the International Association of Machinists (IAM) that would have guaranteed that the 777X would be built in the Puget Sound region but that would also have frozen pension benefits, increased health care costs, and cut back on wage increases for new employees. Jeffrey Johnson, president of the...

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Chapter 1: Fraternalism and the Boeing News in the 1930s

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pp. 27-56

The March 1932 issue of Boeing’s company publication, the Boeing News, introduced a new feature that offered Boeing employees’ “news of interest.” 1 Titled “Shop Notes,” the section focused on the various shop- floor departments that housed the growing blue- collar, mostly male, workforce. Employees were to report stories and announcements to their shop- floor...

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Chapter 2: Manpower versus Womanpower during World War II

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pp. 57-94

In 1939 the Boeing News ran an article headlined “Boeing Craftsmen,” which pointed out that shop-floor development was a routine part of the Boeing “family.” The article noted that men in the cable shop, for example, were “trained in the Shop because skilled men are not available otherwise.”1 Workers were “homegrown” and achieved their skill through time with...

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Chapter 3: Women’s Place in Equal Opportunity Employment

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pp. 95-128

With Boeing’s seventy- fifth anniversary approaching in 1989, company leaders viewed it as the perfect opportunity to take stock. That year, the Boeing Historical Archives began to research what it hoped would be a celebration of “the unique contribution of women at all levels of the company over the course of Boeing’s nearly 75- year history.”1 The project went beyond just...

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Chapter 4: Jane Doe v. Boeing Company

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pp. 129-152

Beginning in the early 1980s there were new challenges to Boeing’s corporate culture that made clear the company’s role in the policing and surveillance of both gender and sexual norms. Jane Doe, a self-identified male-to-female transsexual who desired anonymity, was a Boeing engineer from 1978 to 1985.1 During those years Doe worked in several different...

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Chapter 5: Employing Teamwork

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pp. 153-182

By the end of the twentieth century the familial contract that Boeing leaders and workers had tried to uphold, often unsuccessfully, since the 1930s had been irrevocably altered. As Dana Cloud notes, by the mid- 1990s the company had “completed its turn toward lean restructuring,” which disempowered workers and union organizing in new ways: “The realities...

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Conclusion: Corporate Capitalism in the Twenty- First Century

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pp. 183-190

In 2011 Boeing announced that the company would produce its second line of 787 Dreamliners in North Charleston, South Carolina, rather than in the Puget Sound area. The announcement set off a firestorm of political wrangling. After union complaints, the National Labor Relations Board investigated and charged the company with relocating work to South...

Notes

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pp. 191-236

Bibliography

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pp. 237-250

Index

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pp. 251-262