In this Book

summary

Among the greatest attractions of the Pacific Northwest are its state parks, campgrounds and tree-lined highways. From Idaho hot springs to the Oregon coast, millions of people enjoy this priceless legacy every year but few stop to think about the source of this bounty.

The Park Builders profiles the men who provided the parks, and the times that shaped them. From its beginnings as part of the progressive crusades to its evolution into an expected function of state government, the state parks movement in the Northwest is a window onto the political and social developments of the twentieth century. The states of Washington, Idaho, and Oregon were generally in the mainstream of the parks movement, but each of their histories is unique. Taken together, they help to define the nature and limitations of regionalism in the Northwest.

Especially in the early years, the story of state parks was largely the story of individuals. Drawing extensively from interviews and personal papers, Thomas Cox creates memorable pictures of parks activists in each state. Robert Moran, creator of the battleship, Nebraska, spent a decade lobbying the state of Washington to accept his magnificent acreage on Orcas Island. Sam Boardman went from a road crew to the head of Oregon’s park system, and took up his mission with a zeal that was literally religious: "To me a park is a pulpit," he wrote. "The more you keep it as He made it, the closer you are to Him." In Idaho, Senator Weldon Heyburn, no proponent of state expenditures, set out to create a national park, and ended up with a premier state park, named for him.

State parks serve more people at far less expense than do those in the National Park System. Since their fates are determined largely at the state level, they are an ideal venue for the study of grassroots activism and regional trends. This book is the first to collect these themes into a coherent whole. It will serve as a model for further regional studies of its kind.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright Page, Dedication
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-x
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Preface
  2. pp. xi-xiv
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 1: The Northwest and the Nation: A Parks Movement in the Making
  2. pp. 3-13
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 2: Weldon B. Heyburn and Robert Moran: Two Men and Two Parks
  2. pp. 14-31
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 3: Ben Olcott's Crusade to Save Oregon's Scenery
  2. pp. 32-46
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 4: Conservation by Subterfuge: Robert W. Sawyer and the Birth of the Oregon State Parks
  2. pp. 47-56
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 5: Asahel Curtis, Herbert Evison, and the Parks and Roadside Timber of Washington State
  2. pp. 57-78
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 6: Samuel H. Boardman: The Preservationist as Administrator
  2. pp. 79-103
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 7: Robert E. Smylie and Idaho's State Parks: A Study in Belated Action
  2. pp. 104-120
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 8: All the Governor's Men: Parks and Politics in Washington State, 1957-1965
  2. pp. 121-136
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 9: To Save a River: Robert Straub, Karl Onthank, Tom McCall, and the Williamette Greenway
  2. pp. 137-164
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 10: Parks and Their Builders in Perspective
  2. pp. 165-176
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 177-233
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Bibliographic Essay
  2. pp. 234-236
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 237-248
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Image Plates
  2. restricted access Download |

Additional Information

ISBN
9780295800660
Related ISBN
9780295800660
MARC Record
OCLC
740450360
Pages
260
Launched on MUSE
2016-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.