In this Book

summary

The emergence and spread of literacy in ancient human society an important topic for all who study the ancient world, and the development of written Chinese is of particular interest, as modern Chinese orthography preserves logographic principles shared by its most ancient forms, making it unique among all present-day writing systems. In the past three decades, the discovery of previously unknown texts dating to the third century BCE and earlier, as well as older versions of known texts, has revolutionized the study of early Chinese writing.

The long-term continuity and stability of the Chinese written language allow for this detailed study of the role literacy played in early civilization. The contributors to Writing and Literacy in Early China inquire into modes of manuscript production, the purposes for which texts were produced, and the ways in which they were actually used. By carefully evaluating current evidence and offering groundbreaking new interpretations, the book illuminates the nature of literacy for scribes and readers.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright Page
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. p. vii
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  1. Early China Chronology
  2. p. viii
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  1. Map of Important Archaeological Sites
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Introduction: Writing as a Phenomenon of Literacy
  2. Li Feng, David Prager Branner
  3. pp. 3-16
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  1. Part I: Origins and the Linguistic Dimension
  2. pp. 17-18
  1. Chapter 1: Getting "Right" with Heaven and the Origins of Writing in China
  2. David W. Pankenier
  3. pp. 19-50
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  1. Chapter 2: Literacy and the Emergence of Writing in China
  2. William G. Boltz
  3. pp. 51-84
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  1. Chapter 3: Phonology in the Chinese Script and Its Relationship to Early Chinese Literacy
  2. David Prager Branner
  3. pp. 85-138
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  1. Part II: Scribal Training and Practice
  2. pp. 139-140
  1. Chapter 4: Literacy to the South and the East of Anyang in Shang China: Zhengzhou and Daxinzhuang
  2. Ken-ichi Takashima
  3. pp. 141-172
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  1. Chapter 5: The Evidence for Scribal Training at Anyang
  2. Adam Smith
  3. pp. 173-205
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  1. Chapter 6: Textual Identity and the Role of Literacy in the Transmission of Early Chinese Literature
  2. Matthias L. Richter
  3. pp. 206-236
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  1. Part III: Literacy and Social Contexts
  2. pp. 237-238
  1. Chapter 7: The Royal Audience and Its Reflections in Western Zhou Bronze Inscriptions
  2. Lothar von Falkenhausen
  3. pp. 239-270
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  1. Chapter 8: Literacy and the Social Contexts of Writing in the Western Zhou
  2. Li Feng
  3. pp. 271-301
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  1. Chapter 9: Education and the Way of the Former Kings
  2. Constance A. Cook
  3. pp. 302-336
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  1. Part IV: The Extent of Literacy in the Early Empire
  2. pp. 337-338
  1. Chapter 10: Soldiers, Scribes, and Women: Literacy among the Lower Orders in Early China
  2. Robin D. S. Yates
  3. pp. 339-369
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  1. Chapter 11: Craftsman's Literacy: Uses of Writing by Male and Female Artisans in Qin and Han China
  2. Anthony J. Barbieri-Low
  3. pp. 370-400
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  1. Abbreviations
  2. pp. 401-403
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 404-442
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 443-451
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 452-494
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  1. Image Plates
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780295804507
Related ISBN
9780295804507
MARC Record
OCLC
793207668
Pages
480
Launched on MUSE
2016-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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