Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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1. The Nature-Culture Paradox

Marguerite S. Shaff er and Phoebe S. K. Young

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pp. 1-18

In 2000 the Nobel laureate and atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen coined the term “Anthropocene” to mark the emergence of a new geologic epoch in which humans have become the most “globally potent biogeophysical force” on the planet.¹ As Crutzen and his fellow authors Will Steffen, a climate scientist...

Part I. Animals

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2. Beasts of the Southern Wild: Slaveholders, Slaves, and Other Animals in Charles Ball’s Slavery in the United States

Thomas G. Andrews

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pp. 21-47

On a Mary land road in 1785, a slave family was torn apart. We might be tempted to tell the story of its sudden dissolution simply as a human drama acted out by a Mary land planter, a “Georgia trader,” an enslaved woman, and her four-year-old son. Even half a century later the boy, who published his...

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3. Stuffed: Nature and Science on Display

John Herron

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pp. 48-69

If you wish to see the lone survivor of the 1876 Battle of Little Bighorn, visit the Natural History Museum at the University of Kansas. Tucked into a dark corner on the fourth floor is a humidity-controlled glass case containing the stuffed remains of a twenty-nine-year-old decorated veteran from Custer’s...

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4. Digit’s Legacy: Reconsidering the Human-Nature Encounter in a Global World

Marguerite S. Shaffer

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pp. 70-96

On the evening of February 3, 1978, Walter Cronkite led CBS Evening News with the story of a brutal murder in Africa. A gang of six men in the remote mountains of Rwanda had repeatedly stabbed their victim; the body was found decapitated and with both hands amputated. Despite the violent spectacle...

Part II. Bodies

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5. The Gulick Family and the Nature of Adolescence

Susan A. Miller

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pp. 99-121

Jane Addams set the tone for The Spirit of Youth in the book’s first sentence with the charming double meaning she invested in “the youth of the earth.” Initially she uses the phrase to build her argument that humans have always yearned for a sense of authenticity; we must have faith that each and every...

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6. Children of Light: The Nature and Culture of Suntanning

Catherine Cocks

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pp. 122-137

“Race denotes what man is,” the economist William Z. Ripley declared in 1899, whereas “all these other details of social life”—environment, ethnicity, nationality, and language—“represent what man does.”¹ This distinction between what humans are and what they do, which gained influence over the...

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7. Dr. Spock Is Worried: Visual Media and the Emotional History of American Environmentalism

Finis Dunaway

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pp. 138-162

Everything about him seems so serious: his stiff posture, his stern expression, and his three-piece suit, taut necktie, and collar pin (see Figure 7.1). With hands in pockets, his lips tightly pursed, he looks down at the child, who seems completely unaware of his presence. Below the photograph a brief sentence...

Part III. Places

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8. Prototyping Natures: Technology, Labor, and Art on Atomic Frontiers

Andrew Kirk

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pp. 165-188

The year 2011 marked the sixtieth anniversary of continental nuclear testing. In the year leading up to this milestone interest in the subject surged, journalists rediscovered atomic history, and scholars from a variety of backgrounds took a second look at the science, technology, cultural artifacts, and landscapes...

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9. River Rats in the Archive: The Colorado River and the Nature of Texts

Annie Gilbert Coleman

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pp. 189-217

A tall, athletic young businessman showed up in Green River, Utah, at dinnertime on July 9, 1940. He was looking for a small group of strangers and the river. Starting in Wyoming, the Green flows through Utah on its way to meet the Colorado River and the Grand Canyon. Th ere the river runs a mile below...

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10. Rocks of Ages: The Decadent Desert and Sepulchral Time

Frieda Knobloch

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pp. 218-234

Some geographical spaces have been visibly, many have said legibly, engraved by time, specifically deserts and canyons of the arid American West. These landscapes, including large areas such as the Mojave, Sonoran, Chihuahuan, and Great Basin Deserts (and smaller dry basins throughout the intermountain...

Part IV. Politics

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11. Winning the War at Manzanar: Environmental Patriotism and the Japanese American Incarceration

Connie Y. Chiang

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pp. 237-262

World War II has been remembered as a popular conflict that rallied millions of Americans behind the United States’ effort to defeat the Axis powers and defend President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s “Four Freedoms”: freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear...

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12. Unthinkable Visibility: Pigs, Pork, and the Spectacle of Killing and Meat

Brett Mizelle

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pp. 263-286

Back in 2007 I attended the Pork Industry Forum in Anaheim, California. I had told the organizers at the National Pork Board that I was writing a book¹ on the relationship between humans and pigs and wanted to make sure I was getting the industry’s perspective on the major relationship Americans have...

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13. “Bring Tent”: The Occupy Movement and the Politics of Public Nature

Phoebe S. K. Young

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pp. 287-318

In the initial poster campaign that served as a catalyst for the Occupy Wall Street movement (OWS) in 2011, the central objective remained an open question: What is our one demand? Those drawn to participate shared a sense of outrage with economic in equality and alienation from the political process...

Notes

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pp. 319-380

List of Contributors

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pp. 381-384

Index

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pp. 385-404

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 405-406

First and foremost, this volume is the byproduct of our friendship. We are grateful for the extended opportunities it has provided for us to meet, talk, and enjoy each other’s company. Our conversations began in the stacks of the Huntington Library twenty years ago and have been nurtured over the years...