Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-x

In writing about Central Asia, issues of language are as complex and changeable as is the geography. First, the two source languages for the foreign terms that I gloss in this book are Uzbek and Russian. It can be confusing to navigate the code-switching, so for clarification, when a term comes from the Uzbek language, the gloss is left unmarked. Russian terms presented in text...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

I would like to acknowledge the many generous and talented Uzbek musicians and scholars who share their art, knowledge, and time with me as I continue my work on Central Asian music. My gratitude especially goes to the mentors and teachers who have spent time grappling with the challenge of instructing me on the dutar: Malika Ziyaeva, Ro’zibi Hodjayeva, Razia Sultanova,...

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Introduction: The Stories Women Tell about Their Music

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pp. 1-41

Most ethnomusicologists have a unique story about how they first encountered the music they focus on. Mine begins on a train. In autumn 2000, I was traveling from London to Glasgow for the “Shostakovich Twenty-Five Years On” conference. Just ten days prior, a tragic train derailment in Hatfield had brought rail travel to a standstill and raised major questions about the...

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1. Beyond the Canon: Feminizing the National Project through Traditional Music

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pp. 42-77

When viewers tune in to the Yoshlar (Young People’s) television channel at 7:45 p.m., a daily broadcast of traditional music appears, offering the Oltin Meros (Golden Legacy) segment. The camera starts shooting through geometric latticework with gauzy curtains as lights rise on a semicircle of chairs. Seated there is a group of men in dark suit pants with white button-down...

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2. Ancient Treasures, Modernized: Women’s Dutar Ensembles and Arranged Folk Music

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pp. 78-108

On a scorching summer day in 2002, in a new conservatory building recently opened in Tashkent, it is largely quiet during the vacation period. Nevertheless, the sounds of strumming and chattering female voices emanate from one classroom, as Ro’zibi Hodjayeva (known to her students as Ro’za opa) leads a rehearsal for the dutar ensemble of a local music school. About half...

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3. Like Tereshkova in the Cosmos: Women at the Forefront of Western Art Music

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pp. 109-130

On November 27, 2003, I went to the conservatory to observe a dutar ensemble class taught by Malika opa in the traditional music department. Arriving to find that class had been canceled, I saw that Firuza (one of Malika opa’s dutar students) was sitting at the piano picking out the melody line of what looked like a light classical piece in 6/8 with a moving bass line that could...

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4. “Greetings to the Uzbek People!”: Popular Music in Public and Private Settings

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pp. 131-155

The lights in the Friendship of Nations Concert Hall in Tashkent focus on a stage with musicians on metal risers. On one side is a typical estrada combo, with musicians seated before their instruments: drum set, electric bass, and electric guitar. On the other side of the stage sits a keyboardist, a Turkish...

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5. Marrying Past, Present, and Future: The Essential Work of Wedding Music

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pp. 156-169

It is a clear and bright summer morning in Tashkent in 2002. At 6:00 a.m. I step off the tram to walk a few blocks to Ro’za opa’s apartment, where she and her entourage are gathering to drive across the city and perform at a kelin salom, the bride-greeting ritual that occurs the morning after a marriage ceremony. In the summer months they usually begin painfully early, as...

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Conclusion: Women’s Musical Communities Performing the Nation

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pp. 170-184

It is a chilly day in early February 2005 and I signal for the marshrutka shuttle van to stop at the “Forty Years of Victory” neighborhood bus stop, then walk a few minutes in the cold into a cluster of Soviet-era cement block high-rises. I find the correct building and entrance and, like so many times before, I climb the metal staircase until I reach Malika opa’s apartment. Instead of my...

Notes

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pp. 185-190

Glossary

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pp. 191-192

Works Cited

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pp. 193-204

Index

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pp. 205-212