Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction

Jay Watson

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pp. ix-xxiii

“In the beginning,” writes Henri Lefebvre, “was the Topos.”¹ Lefebvre, perhaps the most influential theorist of space in modern philosophy,² did not have William Faulkner in mind when he penned those words, but he certainly could have. Faulkner studies, after all, is highly invested in its...

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Note on the Conference

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pp. xxiv-2

The thirty-seventh Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference sponsored by the University of Mississippi in Oxford took place July 17–21, 2011, with nearly two hundred of the author’s admirers in attendance. Eleven presentations on the theme “Faulkner and Geographies” are collected as...

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Local Places/Modern Spaces: The Crossroads Local in Faulkner

Barbara Ladd

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pp. 3-16

Faulkner’s relationships with geography were complex. Depending on whom you ask, he is or is not a “Southern” writer. He once wrote that “I’m inclined to think that my material, the South, is not very important to me. I just happen to know it, and dont have time in one life to...

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Designing Spaces: Sutpen, Snopes, and the Promise of the Plantation

Scott Romine

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pp. 17-34

In 1936 William Faulkner marked graphically for the first time the limits of Yoknapatawpha. But in the foldout map of Yoknapatawpha County included in Absalom, Absalom! Faulkner indulged in an authorial conceit that would fail to be borne out by the critical record. In designing a....

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“My New Orleans Gang”: Faulkner’s French Quarter Circle

John Shelton Reed

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pp. 35-49

“If I never much hankered after Paris during the expatriate years,” Hamilton Basso wrote in the 1960s, “it was because, in the New Orleans of that era, I had Paris in my own back yard,” and in the French Quarter of his youth a crowd of artists, writers, journalists, musicians, poseurs, and...

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“No Kind of Place”: New York City, Southernness, and Migratory Modernism

Benjamin S. Child

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pp. 50-64

The project of defining the South in Southern literature is obviously a matter of interest in a forum like the annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference. As Scott Romine reminds us in his recent work, the “Real South of the late South” is, above all else, a product of cultural...

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Jamestown and Jimson Weed: Charting the Autochthonous Claim of William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury

Kita Douglas

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pp. 65-78

In the opening pages of Toni Morrison’s Beloved (1987), Sethe washes chamomile sap from her legs as the unspeakable and repressed memories of her enslavement take sudden violent form in her consciousness:
She might be hurrying across a field, running practically, to get to the pump...

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South by Southwest: William Faulkner and Greater Mexico

José E. Limón

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pp. 79-96

It is now well established that Faulkner’s American geographies extend southeast of Mississippi across the Gulf of Mexico out to the Caribbean Sea but also directly southward to South America. His connection to the Caribbean is certainly well known, particularly to Francophone Haiti...

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Thomas Sutpen’s Geography Lesson: Environmental Obscurities and Racial Remapping in Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom!

Ryan Heryford

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pp. 97-111

The design that will later entail Sutpen’s Hundred begins with a geography lesson, or lack thereof. In a “one-room country school in a nest of Tidewater plantations”¹ Thomas Sutpen’s teacher reads to the class from a book on Haiti and other Caribbean nations: “That was how I learned of...

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Faulkner’s Caribbean Geographies in Absalom, Absalom!

Valérie Loichot

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pp. 112-128

Land of milk and honey, of profit and money, of fear and monstrosity, the West Indies never cease to fascinate the nineteenth-century traveler. In 1887, for instance, the Irish Greek journalist Lafcadio Hearn, living in New Orleans at the time, writes to his friend W. D. O’Connor, “I am...

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A Daughter’s Geography: William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, and a New Mapping of “The Black South”

Farah Jasmine Griffin

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pp. 129-142

This essay is pedagogically driven. What happens, it asks, when you place William Faulkner on what is, for all intents and purposes, an African American literature syllabus? More specifically, what literary insights and geographies emerge when you place Faulkner alongside...

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William Faulkner and the Problem of Cold War Modernism

Harilaos Stecopoulos

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pp. 143-162

Allen Ginsberg’s imagined conversation with T. S. Eliot captures an important strain in US literary history. Eliot may not have been an agent working for CIA bureaucrat James Jesus Angleton, but many twentieth-century studies scholars accept as a truism the Cold War state’s...

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Woman in Motion: Escaping Yoknapatawpha

Lorie Watkins

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pp. 163-174

Feminist geographers have long considered the effect of geographic differences on gender relations and gender equality. As Linda McDowell writes, “The specific aim of a feminist geography . . . is to investigate, make visible and challenge the relationships between gender divisions...

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Contributors

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pp. 175-178

Benjamin S. Child is an assistant professor of English at Colgate University. He has published articles on William Eggleston, Cormac McCarthy, Bob Dylan, and the Cinema Novo movement. He recently completed “Uneven Ground: Figurations of the Rural Modern in the...

Index

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pp. 179-187