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Herodotus and the Philosophy of Empire
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In Herodotus and the Philosophy of Empire, Ann Ward treats the classical writer not as a historian but as a political philosopher. Ward uses close textual analysis to demonstrate that Herodotus investigates recurring themes in the most important forms of government in the ancient world. This analysis of The Histories concludes with reflections on the problems of empire, not only for the Persians and the striving Athenians, but for our own government as well. To this end, Ward contrasts Herodotus on empire with the assumptions underlying speeches and writings of Paul Wolfowitz, Colin L. Powell, Joseph S. Nye, Jr. and Robert W. Merry.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. p. vii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Chapter 1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-22
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  1. Chapter 2. Egypt and Scythia: The Pious and the Poetic Regimes
  2. pp. 23-64
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  1. Chapter 3. Persia and Regimes in Theory
  2. pp. 65-106
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  1. Chapter 4. Athens and Regimes in History
  2. pp. 107-158
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  1. Conclusion: Herodotus and the Role of the Historian
  2. pp. 159-172
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  1. Epilogue: 9/11 and the Politics of Empire
  2. pp. 173-190
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 191-228
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 229-236
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 237-248
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