Series Page, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-xviii

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General Editor’s Foreword to Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works

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pp. xix-xxiv

Since the time that the writings of Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906–45) first began to be available in English after World War II, they have been eagerly read both by scholars and by a wide general audience. The story of his life is compelling, set in the midst of historic events that shaped a century. ...

Abbreviations

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pp. xxv-xxvi

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Editor’s Introduction to the English Edition

Mark S. Brocker

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pp. 1-30

On June 20, 1939, Dietrich Bonhoeffer made his fateful decision to return to Germany from the United States. In a letter to Reinhold Niebuhr he explained his decision: ...

Part 1: Letters and Documents

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A. After the Dissolution of the Collective Pastorates. Berlin. March–May 1940

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pp. 33-50

Just today I received the guide for the study of Article 7 of the Lutheran Formula of Concord, sent out to the brothers “as the Confessing Church’s Lenten greeting” and “as a stimulus to theological work”;[2] I had to ask for the document from others. It has filled me, as I reflect on the future of our Protestant church, with a sadness that I can describe only as deep despair or depression. ...

B. Visitations In East Prussia. June–August 1940

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pp. 51-73

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C. Following the Ban on Public Speaking and the Requirement to Register. Berlin and Klein-Krössin. September–October 1940

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pp. 74-79

I am eager to continue working with you, since my travels in East Prussia in recent months have succeeded in convincing me that the meditations have become a real help for preaching, especially for isolated colleagues. ...

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D. Stay at Ettal Monastery. November 1940–February 1941

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pp. 80-164

Arrived yesterday four hours late in Munich;[2] the whole day quite lively with many acquaintances. In all this I thought often of the gathering at your house! Did it go well? ...

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E. First Trip to Switzerland. February 24–March 24, 1941

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pp. 165-179

after a long time of unsuccessful attempts to find out your new address I have got it here from Lore.[2] You cannot imagine my joy to be able to write to you directly after this period of silence and after all you had to pass through during the last year. Our thoughts and more than that our prayers were with you every day. ...

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F. Following the Ban on Writing. Berlin, Klein-Krössin, Munich. April–August 1941

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pp. 180-214

With this notice, a fine in the amount of 30 (Thirty) Marks is hereby levied against you, in accordance with paragraph 28, subparagraph 1, of the First Regulation of the November 1, 1933, Reich Chamber of Culture Law (RGBI. I, page 797).[2] ...

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G. Second Trip to Switzerland. August 29–September 26, 1941

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pp. 215-224

Many thanks for sending Bill Paton’s book.[2] It is being eagerly read by all who are in touch with us, not least by those whom it concerns in a very special manner. I enclose a Continental reaction. Will you pass this document on to Bill with the following message: ...

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H. Berlin. October–November 1941

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pp. 225-245

Over the course of the week of October 5–12, a number of Jewish families, who for the most part lived in Aryan houses,[2] received a letter from the Jewish Community[3] that their apartment “was scheduled to be vacated.” They were quickly informed that they were not allowed to look for a new apartment, and they were given lists on which they were required to indicate their entire stock of furniture and clothing— ...

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I. Kieckow. December 1941

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pp. 246-250

I still have five hundred sheets of typing paper and two hundred sheets of office paper [Kanzleipapier] ready for you, as well as one hundred envelopes[2] like those I use in writing to you. What would we like to do with them now? Should I send the package to Berlin? Or do you still need it in Kieckow?[3] ...

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J. Berlin and Klein-Krössin. January–April 1942

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pp. 251-265

On January 7, 1942, I received your letter,[2] for which I am very grateful. Of those brothers whom you name as missing or fallen, I know Joachim Staude and Edgar Engler. Indeed, God has torn great holes in the ranks of our brothers. The fate of J. Staude is particularly difficult. Who knows whether he is still alive and under what conditions he is living? ...

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K. Trip to Norway and Sweden. April 10–18, 1942

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pp. 266-273

If my plans remain unchanged, I shall leave tomorrow morning, arrive in Oslo Saturday noon, and shall leave Tuesday morning for Stockholm. Wednesday night from Stockholm to Copenhagen and early Friday from Copenhagen to Berlin. [. . .] ...

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L. Third Trip to Switzerland. May 12–26, 1942

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pp. 274-288

How does the world situation strike you? Since Adolf gave his last speech,[2] everything now seems much more agreeable to me; and after the Japanese were unable to land anywhere with their troop ships, I would like to assume that they were the ones who lost the great naval battle.[3] ...

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M. Trip to Sweden, Berlin, Munich. June 1942

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pp. 289-330

After breakfast Westman and Professor Fridrichsen came in to tell me about Norwegians.[2] [. . .] Karl Hartenstein (with Bonhoeffer) should be invited to postarmistice conference.[3] They agreed generally with Leibholz’s letter to Butler,[4] and importance of Peace Aims with alternatives to Nazi and Communism. Fridrichsen promises to send message from Leibholz to Bonhoeffer.[5] ...

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N. Trip to Italy. June 26–July 10, 1942

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pp. 331-342

On returning home met Press conference at MOI[2] on June 14 good number present. Published impression of visit in Christian Newsletter.[3] Saw Grubb[4] told him about conversations. Saw Warner at F.O.[5] ...

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O. Berlin, Freiburg, Munich, Klein-Krössin, Pätzig. July 1942–March 1943

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pp. 343-403

You can hardly imagine how delighted we were to receive your recent news of May and June.[2] Our joy was greatly compounded because we had heard nothing from you for so long and then found out that at least you are all well. For us it is one of the greatest inspirations to know that in this difficult time you are able to be together and all can pursue their work. ...

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P. Imprisonment in Berlin-Tegel Military Prison. April 5, 1943–October 8, 1944

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pp. 404-458

Over 60% of the Protestant clergy have already been drafted; of those younger clergy belonging to the Confessing Church, over 90%, since there exists no institution, recognized by the state, with the right to access indispensable personnel.[3] ...

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Q. Imprisonment in the Reich Central Security Office Prison, Prince-Albrecht Straße, Berlin, until Bonhoeffer’s Execution in the Flossenbürg Concentration Camp, Upper Palatinate. October 8, 1944–April 9, 1945

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pp. 459-472

Then it was not until October 21 that I was questioned again. Schrey, who on October 6 and 9 had read me most of Goerdeler’s statements from September 4, although he claimed he wasn’t really allowed to do so (they take up about six typewritten pages in my files), showed me the minutes from October 11. ...

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Part 2: Essays and Notes

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pp. 473-610

The resurrection of Jesus Christ is God’s Yes to Christ and his work of expiation. The cross was the end, the death of the Son of God, curse and judgment on all flesh. If the cross had been the last word about Jesus, then the world would be lost in death and damnation without hope; then the world would have triumphed over God. ...

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Part 3: Sermons and Meditations

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pp. 611-644

In the midst of calamitous words and signs announcing imminent doom, divine wrath, and terrifying punishment to the apostate people: 1) the birth of the child; 2) his name—inexpressible; 3) his office.[2] ...

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Editors’ Afterword to the German Edition

Jørgen Glenthøj†, Ulrich Kabitz, Wolf Krötke

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pp. 645-674

This volume’s collection of Bonhoeffer’s correspondence and writings from the years 1940–45 (part 1) falls into clearly delineated categories. First we encounter the “illegal”[1] Bonhoeffer, who is trying to make the most of the limited possibilities still offered by the weakened Confessing Church. ...

Appendix 1. Map of Bonhoeffer’s Germany

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p. 675

Appendix 2. Chronology of Conspiracy and Imprisonment: 1940–1945

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pp. 676-704

Appendix 3. Unpublished Material from Bonhoeffer’s Literary Estate 1940–1945

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pp. 705-706

Appendix 4. Texts Published in DBWE 16 and in Gesammelte Schriften, Ethics (1995), or Letters and Papers from Prison

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pp. 707-710

Bibliography

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pp. 711-750

Index of Scriptural References

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pp. 751-756

Index of Names

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pp. 757-834

Index of Subjects

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pp. 835-880

Editors and Translators

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pp. 881-882