Cover

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Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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Introduction: Men of Feeling

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pp. 1-25

George Eliot and Justin McCarthy, writing in 1854 and 1866, respectively, are responding to a vogue for disabled men in the novels of the mid–nineteenth century. Both writers are skeptical of the proliferation of disability in the novel. Eliot finds it fortunate that heroes...

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1. Charles Kingsley’s and Charlotte Yonge’s Christian Chivalry

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pp. 26-51

Perhaps few authors have enjoyed such differing posthumous reputations as Charlotte Yonge and Charles Kingsley. Kingsley is known today as the author of swashbuckling stories for boys, Yonge as the author of pious family dramas for girls. Although Kingsley did...

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2. Invalidism and Industry in Dinah Mulock Craik’s John Halifax, Gentleman

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pp. 52-75

It may seem like quite a leap to move from the parlors of a genteel high church family found in Charlotte Yonge, or the adventures of the Crimea and the Spanish Armada in Charles Kingsley’s novels, to the world of dissenting trade, the tanyard, and Quakerism found in...

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3. Tom Tulliver’s Schooldays

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pp. 76-102

In George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss (1860), Tom Tulliver, who stands half an inch taller than John Halifax at a full six feet (352), is not all that different from Craik’s paradigmatic self-made man. Like John Halifax, Tom is not afraid to get his hands dirty or deal with cheese, keeps...

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4. The Portrait of Two Gentlemen: Henry James’s Invalids and Self-Made Men

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pp. 103-122

By all rights, Caspar Goodwood and Ralph Touchett should have been friends. Goodwood, the hearty industrialist, and Touchett, the sympathetic invalid, are a pair that would have seemed familiar to Victorian readers. They are around the same age and both matriculated at Harvard...

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Conclusion: Modern Men

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pp. 123-136

Henry James’s portrait of a lonely Caspar Goodwood, unacknowledged on Isabel Archer’s doorstep and unmoved by Ralph Touchett’s funeral, would seem to suggest that there is little place for the strong industrialist in the fiction of the 1880s. The innovative owner of...

Notes

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pp. 137-156

Bibliography

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pp. 157-168

Index

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pp. 169-174