Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xiv

I would first like to thank Professor W. L. Idema for inspiring me to translate The Drunken Man’s Talk and for his patient advice concerning the translation of the work’s more abstruse phrases. I am also extremely grateful for the advice of the two anonymous reviewers of the manuscript who saved me...

read more

Translator’s Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xv-2

In 1940, while war was raging in both Europe and China, an intriguing discovery was made in Japan—one that would offer enthusiasts of traditional Chinese literature an Aladdin’s cave of exciting literary treasures. A single imprint of a long lost medieval Chinese book titled The Record of a Drunken...

read more

1. An Account of the Plowmen of the Tongue

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-9

Since ancient times, humanity has been divided into types: the wise who are pure and refined and the foolish who are sullied and ignorant. The refined are thoroughly conversant with the Three Fundamental Relationships7 and understand the Five Moral Principles,8 whereas the ignorant perpetuate...

read more

2. A Legal Case Involving Illicit Love

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 10-17

Zhang Cui of Guiji had a son and a daughter: a boy named Unicorn and a girl named Jade.¹ Jade later wedded one Lü Junshou while Unicorn married a Mistress Liang. The couples esteemed each other greatly, so much so that they would laugh in unison and, on an outing, sally forth together. After...

read more

3. Romantic Union

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 18-24

Miss Chu was a renowned courtesan from the imperial capital. With unsurpassed refinement and a romantic disposition, she was wont to play with brush and ink and would recite the following poem of springtime travel.
The day doth break and rein in hand, I leisurely seek the spring...

read more

4. Women’s Verse

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 25-32

During the Kaiyuan era of the Tang dynasty, winter clothing was issued to soldiers in the border armies, the Xuanzong emperor having commanded the consorts of the Six Palaces to make them.¹ There was one soldier who, within his short jacket, received a poem that read...

read more

5. Humorous Tales from a Precious Window

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 33-39

Lin Wulang of Chu prefecture lived a simple country life.¹ His family was fairly wealthy and, although he had no son, he did have a daughter named Sujie. Unfortunately she contracted a rash during childhood and, consequently, lost the sight of one eye.
“For a daughter such as this,” deliberated her parents...

read more

6. Veritable Records from the Red-Light District

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 40-45

Liu Qiqing’s other name was Yong.¹ He was a native of Chong’an in Jian prefecture² and his residence was near the Grotto-Realm at Mount Wuyi.³ He had, therefore, the demeanor of an immortal and the bones of one who had attained the Way.4 Flamboyant and unrestrained, generous and heroic...

read more

7. Records from the Red-Light District

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 46-52

The Pingkang district was home to all the courtesans of the Eastern Capital.¹ Entering from the city’s Northern Gate one turns east for three lanes . . .² The most prized courtesans were located mainly in the southern lane. The residences within this lane all boasted spacious and tranquil...

read more

8. Humorous Quips

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 53-57

Dongfang Shuo once said,¹ “Among the smaller creatures, there are none such as mole crickets, ants, mosquitoes,² and insects. And when they engage in debate, we may see how all possess their respective rhetorical logic. How much less then does man, given that he sits at the pinnacle of all earthly...

read more

9. The Characteristics of Ladies

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 58-64

When Qiu Langzhong governed Jian’an,¹ he counted Weng Yuanguang among his coterie. Accordingly, whenever there was a banquet, Weng was certain to be invited. Since all of Qiu’s courtesans poured the wine on such occasions, Weng gained a thorough knowledge of their looks as well as...

read more

10. Poems about Ladies

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 65-70

Before her tender leaves of green upon the boughs are spread,
Reflecting spring’s lucidity are her stamens red.
Were her countenance unfit for palaces and halls,
How could she an imperial tiara be among the flowers all...

read more

11. Romantic Union

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 71-77

Liang Yiniang lived during the [latter] Zhou period of the Five Dynasties and was the daughter of an educated family. At the age of fifteen she could compose both poetry and prose, besides which she possessed a graceful demeanor. She and Master Li were cousins on their mothers’ side and so...

read more

12. Extraordinary Encounters with Immortals

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 78-89

Zhao Xu of Tianshui’s courtesy name was Ziming.¹ In his youth he enjoyed studying and led a abstemious, solitary existence. He was, moreover, handsome. He excelled in discussing matters relating to Daoism and cultivated the ways of Laozi and the Yellow Emperor. He lived alone in a secluded thatched...

read more

13. Virtuous Women of the Inner Quarters

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 90-95

Lady Diao was the mother of Master Yichuan.¹ As a child, her Ladyship’s intelligence surpassed that of most others while there was no aspect of women’s handicrafts of which she was not mistress. She enjoyed reading classics and histories and was thoroughly knowledgeable about both ancient...

read more

14. Legal Cases Involving Witty Verdicts

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 96-104

Li Chunniang of Tan prefecture, whose courtesy name was Shuqing, had originally promised herself to a Mr. Cao. Five years from the time it was arranged, however, the marriage had not been consummated. One day, while strolling in the southern garden, seeing the splendor of the scenery and the...

read more

15. Felicitous Trysts with Immortals

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 105-114

Liu Yi, having unsuccessfully sat for an examination, was returning to the River Xiang region. As he reached Jingyang he caught sight of a woman tending sheep. Thinking it strange,¹ he looked closely and saw that she was uncommonly pretty. Her countenance nonetheless appeared ill at ease and...

read more

16. Broken Promises

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 115-120

Kui is not Wang Kui’s real name.¹ Since his uncles are renowned officials,² I refrain from giving his name. He is however a scholar of note. Yet, having touched on a taboo word in the autumnal examination, he faced a setback in his career. Thus humbled, he embarked on a far-off journey, to Lai...

read more

17. Romantic Betrayal

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 121-131

Master Zhang was the son of a powerful metropolitan official. On the night of the lantern festival, he happened to be taking a stroll to the Temple of Primordial Light (the Extensive Gleanings from the Era of Great Peace records it as the Temple of Compassionate Fealty) when all of a sudden...

read more

18. Extraordinary and Predestined Meetings

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 132-138

Cui Mu was from Yan prefecture and his courtesy name was Zigao.¹ Possessed of a debonair spirit, he also displayed an elegant air and stature. He came to the national university during the Yuanfu period,² bringing with him several million in gold and coin. Once enrolled, thanks to his wealth, he...

read more

19. Old Stories of Reunion 1

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 139-147

Xu Deyan’s wife was a sister of Chen’s last sovereign, Shubao, while he himself was a comrade of the crown prince.¹ Her title was Princess Lechang and she was a paragon of beauty. When Chen’s government was in chaos and Xu realized that he could no longer protect his wife, he said to...

read more

20. Old Stories of Reunion 2

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 148-156

Han Hong was renowned for his poetry throughout the Tianbao era.¹ He was furthermore on good terms with a wealthy man, Master Li, who presented him with a favorite concubine whose name was Mistress Liu. When Han passed his examination the following year, he left his family in Clear...

read more

Appendix: A Missing Story Preserved in the Yongle Encyclopedia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 157-164

The Right Honorable Master Su was prefect of Lüjiang. He had a daughter, Xiaoqing, who was of refined demeanor and bewitchingly seductive. Her fair skin was smooth and fragrant, while her wasp-like waist was beyond compare. One day she was strolling in her garden when her sparkling eyes...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 165-204

Glossary of Chinese Characters

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 205-210

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 211-214