Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Table of Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

Note on Romanization

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pp. xiii-xiv

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1. Collective Security in Asia: The Global Significance of Hong Kong and Southern China

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pp. 1-16

In most accounts of the Second World War, China has not attracted much attention, and this is particularly true of the region south of the Yangtse (Yangtze) River. When authors have considered China, it has been presented largely as an Allied liability of limited significance. ...

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2. Clearing the Decks: Preparing for War in South China, 1935 to July 1937

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pp. 17-36

Chinese resistance during the Sino-Japanese War (1937–1941) was surprising to many Far Eastern observers, but the Chinese determination to continue was encouraged by third powers that provided military equipment and training. By supplying the Chinese army with large quantities of weapons during the conflict, the USSR used the Chinese to fight a proxy war against the Japanese. ...

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3. The Sino-Japanese War Begins: Proxy War in China, July 1937 to October 1938

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pp. 37-88

With the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese War in July 1937, China assumed greater significance on the world’s diplomatic stage, but aside from the Soviet Union, most other countries lacked clear objectives or policies for responding to events. For several powers, China appeared to be a significant bulwark against further Japanese expansion, and the Soviet Union extended material aid in support of the Chinese army and air force. ...

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4. The Trap Is Sprung: October 1938 to March 1939

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pp. 89-124

In October 1938 the Sino-Japanese War escalated with the Japanese invasion of Kwangtung. This move was designed to cut British support for China, but it had the opposite effect of provoking a semiunified Anglo- American economic response. The invasion of south China brought the war to Hong Kong’s door, and the potential for conflict between British and Japanese military forces rose dramatically as a result. ...

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5. Stalemate: March to October 1939

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pp. 125-175

As war clouds gathered in Europe, the impact of the conflict in China on the conduct of international relations became more pronounced. The Sino- Japanese War also increasingly affected the grand strategy of several great powers. Since China’s survival depended on the importation of military supplies from abroad, the region south of the Yangtse River had become one of the most important theaters of the war. ...

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6. Impasse in Kwangsi and Japan's Failed Interdiction Strategy against Hong Kong: November 1939 to May 1940

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pp. 176-201

One of the most significant outcomes of the battle of Nomonhan in August 1939 was the redirection of Japanese strategic attention south. This policy was expressed by the announcement of the Greater East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere in December, but after a year of defeat on the battlefield, Japanese ambitions remained unfulfilled. ...

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7. Leveraging War and Peace: May to December 1940

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pp. 202-245

The spring and summer of 1940 proved to be a transitional period of great significance, with the fall of France ushering in far-reaching changes. Powers on the defensive, such as China and Britain, were able to leverage the possibility of peace to secure greater international support, since the French defeat created a power vacuum in the Far East that was quickly exploited by Japan. ...

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8. The Triumph of Collective Security: Hong Kong, 1941

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pp. 246-285

By the end of 1941, the United States assumed the lead in the anti-Axis coalition, and this transition developed partly in the Far East. Britain had already scaled back its proxy war in China after the temporary closure of the Burma Road in the summer and fall of 1940, yet under changing geopolitical conditions, the conflict remained a potentially useful tool with which to influence other great powers. ...

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9. Empires Derailed: The War in South China, September 1941 to January 1942

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pp. 286-339

Lack of clear Japanese strategic planning greatly contributed to the outbreak of the Pacific war. Until 1941, the Japanese enlarged their empire by reacting to opportunities created by Anglo-French military weakness. Moves such as the occupation of northern French Indochina were also conducted primarily to sever China’s external lines of communication. ...

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10. Collective Insecurity: The Demise of Imperial Power in Asia

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pp. 340-350

From the start of the German invasion of the USSR until U.S. entry into the war, the conflict in China assumed great geostrategic significance. Aided by difficult winter conditions, General Georgy Zhukov and the Red Army blunted the German offensive for Moscow on 6 December 1941 after launching a major counterattack against Field Marshal Fedor von Bock’s Army Group Center. ...

Notes

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pp. 351-428

Bibliography

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pp. 429-440

Index

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pp. 441-465

Back Cover

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