Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

In a book about the pleasures of recreational singing it seems especially appropriate to thank not only some of those who made it possible but also those who made the process of writing it enjoyable.
Among many teachers I should first thank Rodney Haedge, my choir...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-9

This book is about singing as social play and music written and published to function this way in late sixteenth-century Italy. It is about the poetry that singers of such music encounter and how they relate to the fictive voices in this poetry, either being “transported beyond themselves...

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1. The Four-Voice Canzonetta as (and in) Recreational Polyphony

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pp. 10-42

Vincenzo Giustiniani’s Discorso sopra la musica is well known to musicologists as an important account of stylistic change in music of the last quarter of the cinquecento, in particular the rise of professionalized solo singing.1 Written, as Angelo Solerti first demonstrated, in 1628, the...

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2. Intertextuality in Vecchi’s Canzonettas and Madrigals, 1583–1590

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pp. 43-89

As we have seen in chapter 1, by 1580 Vecchi had effectively invented a new genre: the four-voice canzonetta, a kind of music that found immense popularity in print and that was particularly suited to recreational singing. In his first two books of canzonettas, he established the genre’s...

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3. Forest and Feast: The Music Book as Metaphor

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pp. 90-131

Beginning with Selva di varia ricreatione (1590), Vecchi began publishing his music in large collections of pieces in a variety of genres, an approach not taken up by other composers until the rise of the concertato style in print after 1600. In the prefatory texts to Selva and to...

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4. L’Amfiparnaso: Picturing Theater and the Problem of the “Madrigal Comedy”

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pp. 132-175

In The Italian Madrigal Alfred Einstein complained of the “oceans of ink” that had been spilled over L’Amfiparnaso, and indeed in the two centuries preceding his study, virtually all writing on Vecchi centered on this book and on its status as an operatic, proto-operatic, or...

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5. Competition and Conversation: Games as Music

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pp. 176-244

An overarching theme of this book is the way in which music by Orazio Vecchi and some of his contemporaries reveals how singing from printed music could function like a game in Italian courts, ridotti, academies, and more intimate private gatherings. The social acts of choosing...

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6. Representation and Identity in Musical Performance

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pp. 245-294

In chapter 5 we saw how musical depictions of games inscribe standards of polite behavior in courtly and academic contexts through both positive and negative examples. While depictions of game playing may be the most metasocial form of recreational music, other imitations of courtly...

Appendix: Vecchi, “L’hore di recreatione,” from Madrigali a sei (1583)

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pp. 295-328

Notes

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pp. 329-354

Works Cited

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pp. 355-364

Index

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pp. 365-373