Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

As with all long-term projects, we (collectively and individually) have racked up a lot of debts. Collectively, this work has benefited from the comments and suggestions of numerous colleagues: Melinda Gann Hall, Bobbi Herzberg, Mark Hurwitz, Mike MacKuen...

read more

Introduction: The Landscape Of Judicial Elections

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-16

Judicial elections have been described by critics as a failed experiment (O’Connor and McGregor 2012), “economically inefficient” (Chertoff 2010, 48), a “real and increasing threat to . . . fair and impartial courts” (O’Connor and McGregor 2012, 1742), “ ‘wild,’ ‘crazy...

read more

1. Individual-Level Factors and Voter Participation in State Supreme Court Elections

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 17-34

The conventional wisdom about the nature of judicial elections, espoused by interest groups, the media, and policymakers, includes two claims: first, voters do not know anything about judicial elections or the candidates running in them; second, in many cases...

read more

2. Vote Choice in State Supreme Court Elections

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 35-56

In this chapter, we turn our attention from the determinants of participation to the determinants of vote choice. If most voters are completely unfamiliar with judicial candidates as some have claimed, then voting in these elections should be random, and we should not...

read more

3. Voting Decisions in Partisan and Nonpartisan Elections

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 57-68

In the previous chapter, we found that nonpartisan elections are minimally effective at removing partisan cues from voters. While Democrats are somewhat likely to vote for the Democratic candidate (and Republicans are more likely to vote for the Republican...

read more

4. Does One Good Term Deserve Another? Incumbency and Vote Choice

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 69-84

One of the enduring findings in electoral politics is that incumbents generally fare better than non-incumbents. While this finding is reasonably well established, a veritable plethora of explanations exists for this incumbency advantage. Incumbents often enjoy...

read more

5. Voting Yes: Retention Elections

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 85-100

Thus far, we have confined our analysis to contestable state supreme court elections; that is, those elections that are capable of involving more than one candidate. These elections mirror those for executives and legislatures throughout the United States. However, a sizable...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 101-120

In this book, we have explored the individual-level causes of voter participation and vote choice in state supreme court elections, the influences of ballot cues (such as partisan affiliation and incumbency status) on these choices, and the interactions between...

Appendix A: About the CCES

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 121-122

Appendix B: List of Races Included in the Study

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 123-130

Appendix C: Experiments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 131-138

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 139-146

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 147-158

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 159-164