Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-6

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 7-8

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 9-10

Since the early 1990s, a great number of books have been published in English that have “Russia and Ukraine” or “the Russian–Ukrainian encounter” in their titles. The majority of these books are devoted to current political issues, but...

read more

Acknowledgements

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 11-12

I would like above all to thank Professor Andreas Kappeler of Vienna University and Professor Alfred J. Rieber of Central European University— not only did they provide invaluable organizational assistance, but were the first...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 13-60

The only book on the policies of the Russian imperial authorities with respect to the “Ukrainian question” was written in the late 1920s by Ukrainian historian Fedor Savchenko.1 He, along with other colleagues of M. S. Grushevskii, who returned...

read more

1. Russia and Ukrainophilismin the First Half of the NineteenthCentury

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 61-72

The century-and-a-half-long incorporation of the Left-Bank territories into the Russian Empire took place relatively smoothly. The abolition of the Hetmanate’s autonomy at the end of the eighteenth century was part of a wider...

read more

2. The First Years of Alexander II’sReign and Latent Ukrainophilism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 73-86

Even the initial steps towards liberalization after the accession of Alexander II affected the status of the exiled members of the Cyril– Methodius Society. Permission was given for their previously censored works to be...

read more

3. The Advancement of Ukrainophilism in the 1860s.Osnova and the Russian Press

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 87-108

The year 1861 saw a remarkable acceleration in the Ukrainian movement. This was primarily due to the long-awaited (since 1857) foundation of the Southern Russian literary monthly Osnova.When, in October 1858, Kulish officially applied to the Ministry...

read more

4. The Imperial Authorities and Ukrainophilism, 1862 to 1863.The Genesis of the Valuev Circular

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 109-128

Historians have frequently addressed the problem of the genesis of theValuev Circular,sent on 18 July 1863 to the censorship committees,and much of its history has been reconstructed. However,the picturehas never been restored in its entirety since,for various reasons,noscholar was able to obtain access to all the necessary documents.1 How-...

read more

5. The Valuev Circular in GovernmentStructures and Public Opinion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 129-138

The chief procurator of the Holy Synod and the chief of gendarmes welcomed the circular. The letter sent by the latter was lapidary,and contained only one phrase: “I find neither use nor necessity in the publication of Little Russian books...

read more

6. Government Policy after the Valuev Circular

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 139-150

As noted earlier, the Valuev Circular did not become a milestone in government policy. The authorities were in the process of defining their attitude to Ukrainophilism. In September 1863, aide-de-camp Colonel N.V. Mezentsov was dispatched...

read more

7. Strengthening the Russian Assimilation Potential in the Western Borderland

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 151-166

If Valuev’s logic has been reconstructed correctly, the circular should have become only an administrative shelter to protect the Russification program from competitive Ukrainian nationalists. Therefore, to assess the adequacy and efficacy of...

read more

8. The Kiev Period of Ukrainophilism(1872–1876)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 167-190

A new period of Ukrainophilism dates back to the first half of the 1870s,which again,as at the end of the 1850s/beginning of the 1860s, coincided with,or rather became a part of,a broader all-imperial...

read more

9. The Ems Edict

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 191-202

On 27 August 1875 the head of the Third Department,general–adjutant A. L. Potapov,signed the following letter: “Due to the manifestations of Ukrainophile activities,in particular the translation and printing of textbooks and prayer...

read more

10. The “Execution” of the Ems Edict

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 203-210

The first attempt to “rewind” the decision-making process was made by Timashev, right after receiving the final variant of the Ems Edict. Although it is unclear from the documents what steps were...

read more

11. The Consequences of the Ems Edict

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 211-222

An unsigned dispatch dated 4 September 1876 is preserved in the files of the Special Council on Ukrainophilism that was set up by the chancellery of the Third Department. It unambiguously describes the impression created by the Ems Edict...

read more

12. The Subsidy for Slovo..Galician Rusyns in the Policy of St. Petersburg

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 223-232

The paragraph in the Ems Edict dealing with financial support for the Lvov-published newspaper Slovo deserves a separate discussion. This was the first attempt by the authorities to exert a systematic influence on the Galician...

read more

13. The 1880–1881 Crisis of Power and the Attempt to Abolish the Ems Edict

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 233-258

The bomb attack carried out by the conspirators of the People’s Will (Narodnaia volia) in the Winter Palace on 4 February 1880 was the impetus for a radical change in government policy. Appointed as head of a new extraordinary...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 259-274

In the introduction we formulated the two main goals of this study.The first was to reconstruct the decision-making process employed by the authorities in respect to the “Ukrainian question,” and the reaction of Russian public opinion to...

APPENDIX 1

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 275-278

APPENDIX 2

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 279-286

Sources and Literature

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 287-300

Glossary

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 301-302

Index of Names

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 303-307