Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

This is, to an extent, an unexpected book. Since the publication of my book The Ukrainian Question: The Russian Empire and Nationalism in the Nineteenth Century in 2000, I have continued to deal with the issues of empire and nationalism, this time without a hard link to the Ukrainian question.1 ...

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Chapter 1. The History of the Russian Empire: in Search for Scope and Paradigm

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pp. 9-44

When the study is finally written on how the history of the Romanov Empire as a multi-ethnic state was investigated at the end of the last and the beginning of the present century, its author will have no trouble identifying the early 1990s as the boundary between two substantially different stages. ...

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Chapter 2. Russification or Russifications?

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pp. 45-66

The more we learn about the regional peculiarities of interactions surrounding ethnicity and nationalism in various parts of the Romanov Empire the less satisfied we are with numerous overstretched notions that have functioned in historiography for a long time. Among those notions is the term “russification.” ...

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Chapter 3. Identity and Loyalty in the Language Policy of the Romanov Empire at Her Western Borderland

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pp. 67-92

In a linguistically heterogeneous state and even more so in an empire, the regulation of the use of all the languages in government, the courts, and education seems to be an unavoidable practice. In addition to the “usual” regulation aimed—at least, in the view of authorities—primarily at ensuring an efficient functioning of governmental and educational institutions, ...

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Chapter 4. The Romanov Empire and the Jews

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pp. 93-138

In 1526 the Jews were banned from entering Muscovy. That happened soon after several leaders of the Judaizer heresy, which had spread its influence even to the court and profoundly shaken the Muscovite society, were executed in 1504. The ban, with a few qualifications, remained in force until the second half of the eighteenth century, ...

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Chapter 5. “Official Nationality”? A Reassessment of Count Sergei Uvarov’s Triad in the Context of Nationalism Politics

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pp. 139-160

The concept of “official nationality,” which was introduced by the liberal literary historian A. N. Pypin in 1875,1 eventually became the generally accepted term to describe the ideology of Tsar Nicholas I’s reign and also, in particular, Count Sergei Uvarov’s formula of “Orthodoxy, Autocracy, Nationality.” ...

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Chapter 6. The Empire and the Nation in the Imagination of Russian Nationalism

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pp. 161-180

In 1885, the noted literary historian Aleksandr Pypin published an article entitled “The Volga and Kiev.”1 He begins it by recounting a conversation he once had with Ivan Turgenev, known for his mastery of the literary treatment of nature. It comes out in the conversation that the latter has never been on the Volga. ...

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Chapter 7. The Testament of the All-Russian Idea

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pp. 181-210

It is no accident that the First World War is considered by many to be the true beginning of the twentieth century. Its new, sweeping character had deeply changed not only military strategies but also the foreign and domestic policies of the participating powers. ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 211-216

“For many years now, study of Russia as a polyethnic state has been one of the fastest-growing and fastest-moving fields of scholarship in the Eurasian area,” states the recent editorial in Kritika.1 The statement can be accepted with one correction. It has not been such a long time—since the early 1990s that this growth began. ...

Select bibliography

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pp. 217-236

Glossary

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pp. 237-238

Index

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pp. 239-242