Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-viii

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Foreword

Harvey E. Goldberg

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pp. ix-xiv

In a speech to the Fifth Zionist Congress in Basel, December 1901, Max Nordau—the person closest to Theodor Herzl in the Zionist movement—began with these words: “`Knowledge is power.’ Is this always true?” (Nordau 1941, 121). Nordau’s opening seemingly challenged the famous dictum of Francis Bacon, while the purpose of his talk was to make a claim for the importance...

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xviii

This book is based on my dissertation research about the development of anthropology in Israel at the Hebrew University’s department of Sociology and Anthropology. A previous version of the book was published in Hebrew (Abuhav 2010b). The current version is of potential interest to a variety of audiences: chiefly to anthropologists but also to scholars interested in the...

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1. Anthropology in Israel: A Knowledge Field in Israeli Culture and Society

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pp. 1-16

Several interrelated factors have generated interest in the history of the anthropological discipline in Israel: changes in Israeli society, developments in anthropology, and the field’s current status in Israel. Since the 1980s, Euro-American anthropology has undergone a crisis arising from the wake of a critical examination of the nature of anthropological knowledge and methods, issues...

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2. Research, Teaching, and Academe from the Margins Inward: An Emergent Discipline in an Emergent Society

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pp. 17-74

In Israel, some small-scale anthropological research is carried out by government ministries. However, the principal anthropological activity in Israel is the research, teaching, and projects at Israel’s five large universities: the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv University, Haifa University, Ben Gurion University in the Negev, and Bar Ilan University. In addition to these...

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3. The Israeli Anthropological Association as a Site of Anthropological Practice

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pp. 75-106

The Israeli Anthropological Association (IAA) is a voluntary association that overlaps with other (chiefly academic) systems; the ties between these systems shape a number of the association’s characteristics. The identities of its members and its identity as an organization are constructed in relation to professional and national identity, political and intellectual activity, and...

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4. Life Courses of Israeli Anthropologists

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pp. 107-186

What leads a person to become an anthropologist? “Anthropology allowed me to dream.” “Under the umbrella of science, anthropology let my imagination roam.” “We were young, enthusiastic, and up for a challenge, and we wanted to do a new kind of non-institutionalized anthropology that would have its own contribution.” “Research doesn’t belong in a drawer—anthropological...

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5. Israeli Anthropology: The Discipline at Home

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pp. 187-240

I held face-to-face meetings with Israeli anthropologists, asking them to tell me their story. I sifted through correspondence, research and teaching programs, papers on the future of anthropology, and random memos on day-to-day affairs. I read what they wrote and what others wrote about them. I wove a tapestry of Israeli anthropology with threads from both public and...

Appendix: List of IAA Guests by Year

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pp. 241-242

Notes

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pp. 243-246

Bibliography

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pp. 247-268

Index

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pp. 269-274