Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Introduction. What Was Eurasianism and Who Made It?

Mark Bassin, Sergey Glebov, Marlene Laruelle

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pp. 1-12

Historians have long noted the tortured path of Russia’s self-identification vis-à-vis Europe, the West, or modernity on the one hand, and the organization of the domestic political community on the other. At times, the Russian Empire appeared as a European imperium with a civilizing mission in Asia and elsewhere, and at other times it was imagined as an anti-Western force, a bulwark...

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1. A Revolutionary and the Empire: Alexander Herzen and Russian Discourse on Asia

Olga Maiorova

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pp. 13-26

Russian educated society, a product of Peter the Great’s Westernizing reforms, learned to look at the East through European eyes. From the eighteenth century onward, Russian philosophers, poets, and painters borrowed Western stereotypes of the East, embracing both ends of their evaluative spectrum—a fascination with the exotic Orient and a condemnation of what...

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2. The Eurasians and Liberal Scholarship of the Late Imperial Period: Continuity and Change across the 1917 Divide

Vera Tolz

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pp. 27-47

Major intellectual projects, such as the Eurasian movement’s attempt to (re)conceptualize Russia’s role in the world and critically assess the position of Europe vis-à-vis other cultures, can be properly understood only within the broader cultural, political, and social context in which they are articulated. A proper definition and appreciation of such a context allows us to fully grasp...

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3. N. S. Trubetskoi’s Europe and Mankind and Eurasianist Antievolutionism: One Unknown Source

Sergey Glebov

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pp. 48-67

The Eurasianist movement burst onto the Russian émigré scene in the wake of tragic and dramatic events, each of which had a worldwide significance. The First World War, the Russian Revolution, the Civil War, and the emergence of the Bolshevik regime were all enormously important for the articulation of the Eurasianist vision for the space of the former Russian Empire. Russia’s...

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4. Conceiving the Territory: Eurasianism as a Geographical Ideology

Marlene Laruelle

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pp. 68-83

In a polemical text written at the end of the 1920s, Prince Yuri Shirinski-Shikhmatov accused the Eurasianists of endorsing “maximalist nationalism” and criticized the fact that, for them, “it is not a spiritual trait but a material, geographical element that predestines the path of Russia.”1 What, then, is this ever so significant “material” element in Eurasianist discourse—a discourse...

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5. Eurasianism as a Form of Popperian Historicism?

Stefan Wiederkehr

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pp. 84-96

One of the major concerns of the Eurasianists was to revise the fundamental principles underlying scientific inquiry.1 This project was not an end in itself, for they believed that the function of science was not only to provide explanations but also to guide action. In this spirit, they did not restrict themselves to developing innovative methods to investigate the past and the present. In...

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6. Metaphysics of the Economy: The Religious and Economic Foundations of P. N. Savitskii’s Eurasianism

Martin Beisswenger

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pp. 97-112

Among the leaders and ideologists of the Eurasianist movement Petr Nikolaevich Savitskii has attracted particular scholarly attention. No doubt, this attention is partly the result of his eventful biography. Born in the Ukrainian city of Chernigov in 1895, Savitskii experienced the First World War, the Russian Revolution, and the Civil War, and subsequently emigrated from...

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7. Becoming Eurasian: The Intellectual Odyssey of Georgii Vladimirovich Vernadsky

Igor Torbakov

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pp. 113-136

It is very difficult for outsiders, Czeslaw Milosz famously noted, to understand the intractable national problems of Eastern Europe. In his beautifully written Native Realm, Milosz, himself a typical East European, according to his own self-description, paints a nuanced and colorful picture of the mind-boggling mosaic of the numerous peoples, religions, and cultures cohabitating...

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8. Spatializing the Sign: The Futurist Eurasianism of Roman Jakobson and Velimir Khlebnikov

Harsha Ram

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pp. 137-149

In his article “What Is Poetry?” published in Czech in 1933–1934 and quoted above, Roman Jakobson, a founding figure of Russian formalism and structural linguistics, made a striking set of analogies between politics, poetics, and the philosophy of language.1 The autonomy of poetic language and the arbitrariness of the linguistic sign were to literature and theories of language...

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9. Eurasianism Goes Japanese: Toward a Global History of a Russian Intellectual Movement

Hama Yukiko

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pp. 150-164

In 1920, Nikolai S. Trubetskoi criticized Japan in his book Europe and Mankind as having been voluntarily Europeanized and about to discard its uniqueness. This chapter considers how Trubetskoi’s message was received in Japan and examines the relations between Russian émigré Eurasianism and Japan’s pan-Asianism. This allows us to evaluate Eurasianism from a...

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10. Narrative Kulikovo: Lev Gumilev, Russian Nationalists, and the Troubled Emergence of Neo-Eurasianism

Mark Bassin

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pp. 165-186

One of the most striking features of identity debates in post-Soviet Russia has been the persistent appeal of the ideas of Eurasianism. Indeed, thanks to the efforts of enterprising and competent ideologues such as Aleksandr Dugin, what might be called “neo-Eurasianism” has now taken shape as a more or less discrete political-ideological camp, complete with its own...

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Postface. The Paradoxical Legacy of Eurasianism in Contemporary Eurasia

Marlene Laruelle

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pp. 187-194

Readers of this work will perhaps note above all Eurasianism’s unsuspected diversity, a diversity that plays out in terms of intellectual lineages, scholarly orientations, and disciplinary methods, but also in terms of the individual trajectories of its main figures. This feeling is heightened upon encountering the multifaceted nature of the Eurasianist motif in the post-Soviet...

Notes

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pp. 195-256

Contributors

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pp. 257-260

Index

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pp. 261-272

Back Cover

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