Cover

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Title page, Series page, Copyright

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Contents

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Acknowledgements

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pp. vii-viii

It took a village to complete this book over several years; as there are a great many people to thank, the reader will excuse both my excesses and my omissions.
I offer huge thanks to friends, colleagues, and family who provided vast quantities of encouragement, populist and scholarly feedback, technical support...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-20

It was 1999. Nunavut was the newest Canadian territory. Former TV host Adrienne Clarkson had been appointed Canada’s first Chinese-born Governer General. Over 50,000 protesters converged on Seattle to protest the effects of globalization. And Molson, responding to the dampening effects of free trade...

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1. Affect Theory: Becoming Nation

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pp. 21-34

I write about the nation from where I live: from my living room, with its Panasonic flat-screen TV next to bookshelves with their weight of theory; from the narrative of my so-called “ethnic” identity and its necessarily othered relationship to Canadian identity. My own critique of roots, and of the terms...

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2. The Televisual Archive and the Nation

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pp. 35-52

You must obtain permission; it takes time to do this. You will be regarded with mild suspicion or perhaps bemusement. Your body will pass, a metallic shadow, through various security devices; you will enter a sterile, windowless room. You are going home as you do this, though you do not know...

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3. Whose Child Am I? The Quebec Referendum and the Language of Affect and the Body

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pp. 53-68

As early as the 1960s, McLuhan claimed that the electronic age would lead to the separation of Quebec. He argued that technology “would permit Quebec to leave the Canadian union in a way quite inconceivable under the regime of railways. The railways require a uniform political and economic space. On...

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4. Haunted Absences: Reading Canada: A People’s History

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pp. 69-86

I once showed students an excerpt from a 1996 CBC special, Who Is a Real Canadian?, a televised “town hall” debate about official multicultural policy in Canada programmed in the wake of the Quebec referendum of October 1995.¹ The debate had the predictably “balanced” mix of brown and white...

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5. An Otherness Barely Touched Upon: A Cooking Show, a Foreigner, a Turnip, and a Fish’s Eye

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pp. 87-100

In the heady early days of official Canadian multiculturalism, my mother, like many of her generation of Ukrainian immigrants, became an unofficial publicist for all things Ukrainian. One January, she called up all her media contacts to inform them that January 6 was the “real” Christmas for East Europeans...

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6. National Mania, Collective Melancholia: The Trudeau Funeral

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pp. 101-116

As a child in the 1970s, I was too young for Trudeaumania. My mother, in her late thirties,was perhaps a tad too old.Nonetheless, it was from her mouth and through my ears that I experienced this particular affect that was sweeping the nation.
Trudeaumania is the name popularly given to the...

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7. Homeland (In)Security: Roots and Displacement, from New York to Toronto to Salt Lake City

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pp. 117-136

On September 11, 2001, broadcast and print media around the world narrated the destruction of New York City’s World Trade Center, and the deaths of thousands of its occupants. This chapter examines the ways in which Canadian television and its appendages (the telephone, the cellphone, the Internet...

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Conclusion: Empty Suitcases

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pp. 137-146

At the Pier 21 Museum in Halifax, suitcases are the first thing you see— a small pile of them, battered, old, covered with stickers, juxtaposed against a sepia-toned photo montage of smiling white immigrants and ships. “Pier 21: Remembering Canada’s heritage,” reads the slogan beside these images. When...

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CODA: Fascinating Fascism: The 2010 Olympics

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pp. 147-154

In 1935, an ambitious young German filmmaker was commissioned by Germany’s Ministry for Propaganda and Enlightenment of the Third Reich to create a promotional film for the Games of the XI Olympiad, to be held in Berlin the following summer (Sontag).¹ The filmmaker’s name was Leni Riefenstahl...

Notes

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pp. 155-162

Works Cited

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pp. 163-176

Filmography

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pp. 177-178

Back Cover

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