Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-14

Gripped by a severe recession in late 2007, the United States suffered the most sustained and extensive wave of job destruction the country had seen since the Great Depression. Over the next year and a half, unemployment topped 10 percent, and the number of Americans facing long-term...

read more

Chapter 1. Democratic Divisions on Work and Welfare

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 15-42

Two eras command attention in the historical development of both the U.S. welfare state and the modern Democratic Party: the New Deal of the 1930s and the Great Society of the 1960s. Both were launched by liberal Democratic presidents backed by sizable congressional majorities, and the...

read more

Chapter 2. Welfarists Confront Workfarists: The Family Assistance Plan

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 43-66

As the 1968 presidential race took shape, welfare reform emerged as an unavoidable campaign issue for both parties. In addition to congressional complaints about AFDC’s rising price tag, a growing chorus of opposition arose from state and local officials facing grave fiscal...

read more

Chapter 3. Building Workfare: WIN II, SSI, and EITC

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 67-96

Senator Russell Long had headed home to Louisiana victorious when Congress adjourned in December 1967. He had regaled a crowd in Shreveport with the story of how his eleventh-hour maneuver on the Senate floor had foiled a filibuster planned by liberal Democrats, securing passage...

read more

Chapter 4. The Political Economy of Work and Welfare

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 97-125

By the mid-1970s, successive policy changes had conditioned a growing proportion of federal public assistance on private employment. Only the elderly and disabled poor were categorically exempt from work. Others eligible for aid, through new programs such as the...

read more

Chapter 5. The Conservative Assault and the Liberal Retreat

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 126-159

In the years spanning the election of Ronald Reagan and the passage of welfare reform legislation under Bill Clinton, policy battles over work and welfare exploded onto the national political agenda. But welfare reform was only one act in a much larger struggle over...

read more

Chapter 6. The New South and the New Democrats

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 160-179

Th e welfare reforms of the 1990s have posed a puzzle for policy analysts: how and why did Bill Clinton, a moderate Democrat, rewrite the social contract for poor families on terms that would be the envy of Ronald Reagan? Accounts of the Clinton welfare reform focus on a number of proximate...

read more

Chapter 7. Showdown and Settlement

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 180-209

Democratic Party liberals were cautiously optimistic as Bill Clinton prepared to enter the White House in 1993. Despite the New Democratic rhetoric, there were enough liberal proposals sprinkled through his stump speeches for liberals to hold out hope that Clinton shared their core commitments...

read more

Chapter 8. The New World of Workfare

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 210-241

Major questions remained in the wake of the Clinton reforms. Would the policy settlement on workfare hold? What impact would the new policy framework have, given conditions in the job market? Would workfare create new opportunities or new sources of insecurity...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 242-256

There was much bold talk at the turn of the twenty-first century about leaving behind the old for the new. In social and economic policy, references to the changes wrought by the “New Democrats,” the “New South,” and the “New Economy” were ubiquitous. These were overlapping and mutually...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 257-318

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 319-326

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 327-328