Cover

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Title Page, Frontispiece, Copyright, Dedication, Biographies

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Foreword

Loretta V. Metoxen

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pp. xi-xii

Laura Miriam Cornelius was born in 1880 in a log home on a trail in the center of the Oneida Indian Reservation. The trail was to become Old Seymour Road and Laura was to become known as Laura Minnie Kellogg. It was a time of extreme conflict between...

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Preface

Kristina Ackley and Cristina Stanciu

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pp. xiii-xviii

Laura Cornelius Kellogg’s astute and politically loaded question—why not “keep an Indian an Indian”?—evokes, in many ways, her legacy as an Oneida leader and as an American Indian intellectual of the early twentieth century, a time when Native people in the United...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xix-xxii

A huge Yaw^ko goes to a number of people, without whose timely and thoughtful assistance this book would never have been completed. First and foremost, I should acknowledge that Cristina has been the essential motivator and inspiration for this project, tackling...

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Chronology

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pp. xxiii-xxx

Born on the Oneida Indian Reservation (Seymour, Wisconsin), near Green Bay, Wisconsin, the daughter of Adam Poe and Cecilia Bread Cornelius. US Indian Census Rolls of 1925 report Kellogg’s birth year as 1879, but genealogical records held by the...

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Introduction. Laura Cornelius Kellogg: Haudenosaunee Thinker, Native Activist, American Writer

Cristina Stanciu and Kristina Ackley

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pp. 1-62

Scanning through a recent edition of the Wisconsin Oneida tribal newspaper, Kalihwisaks (“she looks for the news”), we read stories that cover a variety of issues: the tribe’s passage of a judiciary law that will implement a new court system, photos of a youth powwow...

Our Democracy and the American Indian:A Comprehensive Presentation ofthe Indian Situation as It Is Today

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Publishers’ Introduction, 1920 Edition

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pp. 65-66

For four centuries the white man has put off the day of reckoning with the American Indian. Whatever may have been our intention in our relations with the Red man, one thing is certain: our policy has been a haphazard anomaly, not consistent with our principles of Government...

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Chapter Synopses, 1920 Edition

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pp. 67-70

The Origin of the League of Nations—Our Democracy—The Birth of the Leader—The Long Trail—Sagoyewhata, the Awakener— The Message of Peace and Love—The Iroquois Confederacy—The League of the Five Nations—The Great Island of the Peaceful...

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1. To the American People

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pp. 71-74

The idea of the League of Nations¹ and Democracy originated on the American Continent about 600 years ago. It came from an American Indian.
At a time when the jungles of wilderness in what is now the Empire State, and the region of the Great Lakes resounded with the war-whoop...

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2. To the American Indian

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pp. 75-78

If I did not believe there were enough left of my Red clan to make it worthwhile to say the last word, I should not speak. If I did not believe enough of you remain staunch to our ancestral standards of truth, to stand the ugly facts that concern us now, I should not speak...

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3. The Lolomi Program of Self-Government

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pp. 79-98

Years of search brought me the Indian word which means just what I wish to bring to the race. Lolomi is a Hopi term and it means “perfect goodness be upon you.”19
So long has this race had Siberian exile, that the only order which can in any way atone for crushed spirits...

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4. How the Lolomi Handles theSocial Side of the Problem

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pp. 99-108

So interdependent are the business and social problems of the Red man, they cannot be separated in his life. Lacking a stable income or credit on the business side, the task of the social survey is to see how these things affect his health, his psychology, his morals, his efficiency...

Other Writings

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The Legend of the Bean

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pp. 111-112

In a brown tepee, nestling cozily in a mass of summer foliage, and shaded from the hot June sun by magnificent old trees, under whose spreading branches, the rich, black sod fed many a flower and fern, lived in years gone by one who had seen many moons wax...

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The Sacrifice of the White Dog

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p. 113

Oh that the expanse of time were less, and the camp fire burning, to make my story glow with interest to my reader. But my pen paints poorly, and you understand not the old Oneida vocabulary, which so well my tale would tell. Briefly but barely I must tell...

A Tribute to the Future of My Race

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pp. 114-118

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Overalls and Tenderfoot

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pp. 119-132

It was five o’clock on the morning of a summer day, when the train from San Francisco emptied a motley crowd of mankind on the long platform of the Raymond stations. This was the last railway point into the Yosemite Valley. The crowd looked about stupidly to find...

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Building the Indian Home

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pp. 133-137

To attempt the solution of the Indian question is the duty of every educated American Indian. Only when the Indians themselves demonstrate each step of the problem can the final answer be reached. Years ago the mistakes in bringing up the American Natives...

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She Likes Indian Public Opinion

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pp. 138-139

The last few issues of Carlisle’s publications have so aroused my interest that I cannot refrain from humbly participating in an “Indian Council.” Not that the pages of the little paper have been filled, lately, with literature superior than formerly, but the part in it I...

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Industrial Organization for the Indian

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pp. 140-153

[The Chairman: The next paper is by Laura M. Cornelius, on “Industrial Organization for the Indian.” Miss Cornelius is a Wisconsin Oneida.]
Whether he is a citizen or not, or whether he has lands or not, whether his trust funds continue or not, whether he is educated or...

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Some Facts and Figureson Indian Education

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pp. 154-166

The word education has several meanings to our race, and at the start I wish to clear up in our minds a common misunderstanding of the term. To some of our Indians at home, going away to a government school means an education from which we may expect...

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Presentation at the Dedication of Lorado Taft’s Indian Statue Black Hawk

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pp. 167-172

RESPONSE [to Edgar A. Bancroft’s address]—WYNNOGENE
MR. LOWDEN: I now have the very great pleasure of introducing Wynnogene of the Oneida-Iroquois (Miss Laura M. Cornelius), who will make a further response to Mr. Bancroft’s address.
WYNNOGENE: Like the faint whispers of the last leaf upon the...

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Testimony during Hearings on H.R. 1917

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pp. 173-196

[In her testimony Kellogg criticizes the Indian Bureau and the general incompetence and graft of its employees, calling their work the “reign of paternalism.” She also advocates for funding for the Lolomi industrial village plan, which will lead to economic development based on...

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Statement, US Senate Committeeon Indian Affairs (1916)

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pp. 197-201

[In her testimony, Kellogg calls for a congressional “scientific investigation” to uncover the demonstrated incompetence in the Indian Bureau. She also presents her proposal for industrial development and for instituting a policy of self-help, expressing the wish to “continue...

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Testimony before Senate Subcommitteeon Senate Resolution 79

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pp. 202-250

[Kellogg’s testimony is part of a larger contingent of Haudenosaunee leaders from New York State testifying about the conditions they face, raising issues that will continue to be of importance throughout the twentieth century. Kellogg’s husband, Orrin J. Kellogg, also testifies...

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Appendix: List of Selected Articles from Local, National, and International Newspapers

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pp. 251-252

What follows is a chronological list of newspaper articles we are unable to reprint in full, but which have been very useful to us in piecing together the many facets of a very complex person, writer, and activist. Many of these articles have been digitized and will be available to the interested reader through...

Notes

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pp. 253-280

References

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pp. 281-290

Index

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pp. 291-303