Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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General Editor’s Foreword to Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works

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pp. vii-xii

Since the time that the writings of Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906–45) first began to be available in English after World War II, they have been eagerly read both by scholars and by a wide general audience. The story of his life is compelling, set in the midst of historic events that shaped a century. ...

Abbreviations

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pp. xiii-xiv

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Editor’s Introduction to the English Edition

Clifford J. Green

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pp. 1-24

After two and a half years working for the resistance movement to overthrow the Hitler regime, and writing his Ethics at the same time, Dietrich Bonhoeffer was arrested on April 5, 1943. While the Nazi investigators pored over the part of the Ethics manuscript they had confiscated from his desk, Bonhoeffer endured his first cold and uncomfortable night in the Tegel military interrogation prison, Berlin. ...

Drama

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Scene 1

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pp. 26-37

Living room in an upper-middle-class home. Evening. Grandmother and Little Brother are sitting at a table with a lamp on it. The grandmother is a woman of about seventy, simply dressed. Little Brother, about ten, is dressed appropriately for his age. He listens very attentively as his grandmother reads to him.[1] ...

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Scene 2

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pp. 38-51

Christoph’s study, a typical student room. Books, pictures? A desk covered with lots of handwritten papers. He sits at the harpsichord, playing “Farewell to the Clavichord” by C. P. E. Bach.[1] Afternoon. Ulrich enters unnoticed as Christoph is playing, comes up quietly behind him, and suddenly puts his hands over Christoph’s eyes. ...

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Scene 3

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pp. 52-70

In Heinrich’s room.[1] A bed, table, chair, sofa, picture, all in the style of the cheapest rental apartment. On the table a pistol, a bottle of schnapps and a glass, some leftovers and a few papers. Heinrich walks back and forth restlessly, smoking a cigarette. The door opens quietly, without a knock. ...

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Novel: Sunday

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pp. 71-182

It was a hot July day in a midsized city in northern Germany. The sun had risen in a cloudless sky and already was burning down on the suburban boulevard as Frau Karoline Brake walked home from church. A bit exhausted, the elderly lady sat down for a rest on a bench in the city park. ...

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Story

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pp. 183-194

With a satisfied and complacent smile,[1] Sergeant Major Meier accepts a rather large package and slips it into his briefcase, which he carefully locks up in his desk. Then he puts on his official face and asks, “And your heart trouble, Müller?”[2] ...

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Editor’s Afterword to the German Edition

Renate Bethge

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pp. 195-233

He made notes for the study, including phrases like “Insight into the past.—Fulfillment, gratitude. Regret.”—“The significance of illusion.”— “Past: why write ‘Everything will be over in a hundred years’ instead of ‘Until recently everything was all right’? ...

Chronology

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pp. 234-235

Appendix

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pp. 236-244

Bibliography

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pp. 245-257

Index of Scriptural References

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pp. 258-259

Index of Names

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pp. 260-276

Index of Subjects

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pp. 277-285

Editors and Translator

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pp. 286-287