Cover

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Title page, Copyright page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

Illustrations

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pp. vii-vii

Tables

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pp. viii-viii

Abbreviations

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pp. ix-xiv

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Preface

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pp. xv-xviii

This book hopes to settle debates about public spending in classical Athens. It confirms the priorities that the Athenians set for their state. I began this book as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Sydney. I completed it as a member of the University of Queensland’s Cultural History Project. I wrote a lot of...

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1. Public-Spending Debates

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pp. 1-26

This book calculates the public spending of classical Athens. In so doing it confirms the priorities that its citizens had for their state. The major public activities of the Athenian dēmos (“people”) were the staging of religious festivals, the conducting of politics, and the waging of wars. There is hot debate about what was spent on these three public activities....

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2. The Cost of Festivals

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pp. 27-51

With justification the classical Athenians believed that they staged more festivals than any other Greek polis (“city-state”). The City Dionysia and the Great Panathenaea were by far the largest of their heortai (“festivals”) and so accounted for a significant proportion of what they spent on their program of polis-sponsored religious celebrations. Therefore...

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3. The Cost of Democracy

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pp. 52-90

Ancient historians fiercely debate how the classical Athenians paid for their system of government. Certainly the dēmos (“people”) spent a lot of public funds on it. This was largely the result of their decision to pay themselves to run the democracy. In the 450s they voted to introduce misthos (“pay”) for jurors. In the 440s or the 430s they began to pay councilors...

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4. The Cost of War

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pp. 91-113

In classical Athens military spending varied greatly from 430 to 350. In the Peloponnesian War’s course the Athenians lost no less than 50 percent of their population. Their final defeat in 405/4 brought to an end their income-bearing arkhē (“empire”). After this war the dēmos (“people”) were simply not capable of waging wars on the same...

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Conclusion. Public-Spending Priorities

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pp. 114-120

This book refutes Böckh’s negative view of what classical Athens spent on festivals. It shows the literary evidence that Böckh cited in defense of his view to be unreliable. The major activities of this polis (“city-state”) were religious celebrations, democratic politics, and military campaigns. There is no doubt which of them the dēmos (“people”) saw as their...

Notes

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pp. 121-150

Works Cited

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pp. 151-168

Index of Sources

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pp. 169-184

General Index

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pp. 185-191