Cover

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Title page, Editorial series, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

Even before my untimely departure from Yemen following the cancellation of the Fulbright program there for security reasons, Mark Tessler had suggested Bahrain as an auspicious candidate for the sort of mass attitude study I hoped to conduct on the topic of group conflict. And when it became clear after some eighteen...

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Introduction: Bahrain, the First Post-Oil State

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pp. 1-11

The persian gulf kingdom of Bahrain is commonly cited as the Arab world’s first “post-oil” economy, both in the sense of its being the place of the first discovery of commercial quantities of oil in the region, and also the first to have effectively run out. The former meaning is now largely a point of trivia...

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1. Group- Based Political Mobilization in Bahrain and the Arab Gulf

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pp. 12-37

Born of the newfound importance of oil-exporting nations in the 1970s and 1980s, the idea of the “rentier economy” arose in economics as a description of those countries that rely on substantial external rent, the latter defined broadly as a reward for ownership of natural resources, whether strategically located...

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2. Al-Fātiḥ wa al-Maftūḥ: The Case of Sunni- Shi‘i Relations in Bahrain

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pp. 38-63

Tiny though it is, the 33-island archipelago of Bahrain, situated 15 miles off the eastern coast of Saudi Arabia in the Persian Gulf, is an ideal location in which to examine the disruptive influence of group-based political mobilization on the normal function of the rentier state. Indeed, for a kingdom but half the size...

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3. Religion and Politics in Bahrain

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pp. 64-85

In bahrain one may readily distinguish Sunni from Shi‘i from any number of details: speech and accent (the former pronounce the Arabic kaf as the English k, e.g., the latter as ch1); facial hair and dress (Salafis keep unkempt, often henna-dyed beards, while Shi‘a are less likely to wear the typical Gulf Arab head...

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4. Surveying Bahrain

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pp. 86-104

Presenting as it does simultaneous advantages and disadvantages from both a practical and methodological standpoint, the choice of Bahrain as empirical testing ground for the study of group conflict in the rentier state requires some preliminary words. We may begin by considering the more important...

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5. Rentier Theory and Rentier Reality

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pp. 105-141

More than simply offer empirical evidence of a general sectarian political disagreement in Bahrain, the present chapter seeks to evaluate the specific theoretical arguments elaborated thus far in explanation of the larger case of Bahrain—the case of the failed rentier state, unable to buy its way to political...

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6. Political Diversification in the Age of Regime Insecurity

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pp. 142-160

In late April 2011, six weeks into a brutal period of martial law that effectively ended the existential threat to the regime posed by the February 14th uprising, Prime Minister Khalifa bin Salman took the opportunity to thank the Bahraini people—government supporters, that is...

Appendix

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pp. 161-168

Notes

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pp. 169-190

Bibliography

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pp. 191-198

Index

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pp. 199-211